Monthly Archives: January 2020

BAMA announces appointment of new Vice Chair

The British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (BAMA) has announced the appointment of Peter Watmough, global detection products manager at Cascade Technologies, a division of Emerson Automation Solutions, as Vice-Chair of the Association.
Peter will take over from James Smith, Summit Europe, who has served as Vice-Chair of BAMA since 2018.

With several years of experience on the BAMA board of directors, Mr Watmough’s focus will be centred on helping the association to deliver its 2025 strategy, expanding the membership base and sharing knowledge with stakeholders across an increasing diverse range of industries.

Patrick Heskins, BAMA chief executive, said: “Peter brings a wealth of industry experience and technical know-how to the role and I am very pleased to welcome him as the new Vice-Chairman.

“The coming year is likely to present many new challenges with significant political upheaval and the anticipated changes in the regulatory landscape. Peter’s experience will be critical in supporting BAMA’s members as the association works to ensure their voices are heard at all levels.”

“I would like to thank James for his support during the last 18 months and throughout a period of great uncertainty for the industry.”

Peter Watmough commented: “Despite the varied challenges facing industry, the UK remains the largest filler in Europe, the third largest in the world and will continue to make a very significant contribution to the UK economy as we move into a new decade.
“As every business strives to operate as efficiently as possible, it is likely that we will see greater need for the services of associations like BAMA, particularly to ensure regulatory changes do not have adverse or unintended consequences. I will work closely with the BAMA team and membership to ensure the association remains well placed to provide the resources and support required and respond effectively to any issues the industry faces whether local or global.”

BAMA’s World renowned Aerosol Technology Course is having a make-over!

Packed into two days is information on aerosol regulations, formulations and filling, as well as advice on the choice of propellants, valves, containers – bought to you by industry experts.

And the new format Day 2 will now incorporate a practical workshop in the UK aerosol laboratory of the Lindal Valve company. Here you will learn more about valves, the basics of sealing the valve to the can and get to fill different formulations. You will also be able to carry out lab tests on aerosols that measure the discharge rate, the particle size distribution and the flammability of the aerosols.

This course will help those in all functions across the industry, from R&D to procurement, from line operatives to senior managers. It distils all aspects of aerosol technology in to an easily digestible format, showing how each part of the aerosol package interacts to create the final consumer product, that is unlike any other packaging format.

The course cost now includes overnight accommodation and an evening meal, where you can spend time networking with the course tutors and the other delegates and, if you want, learn a little more about the history of the industry in an informal environment. Spaces will be limited due the number of people we can safely fit in to the lab and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

The new Technology Course will be taking place on Tuesday 17th & Wednesday 18th March 2020 at The Woburn Hotel, Woburn, Milton Keynes. For more information and to take advantage of this exciting development contact Sallytilbury@bama.co.uk.

Blockchain technology

‘Blockchain’ – what is it and why do we care?

Chances are you’ve probably heard of blockchain – and you’ve almost certainly heard that it’s going to be the next big thing. You’ve been told that it could transform the way that both your business and the market work. However, more likely than not, you are in the dark as what all the fuss is about and how this is going to happen.
That’s because this technology is at a very early stage in its development and few can assess realistically what it can actually deliver. In fact the first blockchain was only created in 2009 as part of the development of the crypto-currency Bitcoin.
So what actually is blockchain, and is it really as important as many people have made out?

The DEFINITION of BLOCKCHAIN
A blockchain is a type of distributed ledger, which records a series of transactions as digital records or ‘blocks’. What makes it unique is that these blocks are inextricably linked, despite not being stored in the same place. This makes the records secure, because there isn’t a central source to be attacked and the records can be made unique and permanent. They can’t be altered without the changes themselves being recorded.

Blockchain was a breakthrough technology for crypto-currencies, because it could be used globally and prevent anyone spending the same unit of currency twice. For a business, it creates a way of maintaining a unique, indisputable history of all its interactions with different parties: suppliers, partners, customers and ensure the traceability and integrity of its data.

HOW can BUSINESSES use Blockchain?
Proponents of blockchain have latched on to its transparency as a solution to every problem facing businesses, from supply chain management to micropayments. However, as with so many breakthrough technologies, blockchain can’t bring about these changes by itself. It’s the systems and applications built around it that will drive real impact.

Certain applications are straightforward. For example, a company could use blockchain to store details of its unique product formulation. The production line at a filler, for instance, would automatically stop and alert management, when a discrepancy was detected against the original records – any change a third party (hacker, malaware) attempted would be spotted before damage could take place.

Transforming DATA QUALITY and DATA OWNERSHIP
It’s not just the management of data that blockchain could change, though. Potentially far more significant are the implications of the technology for ownership and control of proprietary data.
Looking at the chemical industry, blockchain could take this out of the hands of manufacturing partners – and put it into the hands of the owners whom the data relates to. This is critical when brand and public image are at stake and the supply chain behind a marketer is large, fragmented and possibly outsourced. Any change of hands brings with it a risk, the more severe the risk, the higher the level of security required. For patented products and registered trade marks, avoiding counterfeit is paramount and a switch towards higher security, control and integrity, certainly worth the investment behind it.

WHERE are we in the PROCESS?
Aspects of this huge transformation are already happening. The UK government’s Midata project, for instance, has made financial services companies and energy suppliers store their data in a form that customers could access and share with other providers. One of the major barriers to large-scale adoption of the personal information economy has been the technology required to create secure, personal data stores. If blockchain solves that problem, then the relationship between people and data could be transformed, and marketing could be on the verge of a revolution.