Author Archives: BAMA

About BAMA

The British Aerosol Manufacturers' Association (BAMA) represents the aerosol supply chain, from suppliers of components and ingredients to Fillers and Marketers. The association offers a range of business support and advice services to members and represents the views of the industry to legislators and regulators.

CLP Regulations – are you compliant?

Simon RobinsonSimon Robinson, Director at Safeware Quasar is this month's guest blogger.

The highly publicised June 1st deadline for CLP implementation of chemical mixtures finally arrived this Monday, to the best of my knowledge we all survived and life carried on regardless. So in reality what has changed and how can we expect the regulatory landscape to evolve over the next few years?

The Classification Labelling and Packaging regulations EC No. 1272/2008 which implements the new global system for classifying chemicals and mixtures in Europe entered its final implementation phase for the classification and labelling of mixtures. This Regulation aligns previous EU legislation on classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals to the GHS (Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals).

The CLP Regulation was published in the Official Journal 31 December 2008 and entered into force on 20 January 2009. The deadline for substance classification according to the new rules was the 1st December 2010 and for mixtures a deadline of the 1st June 2015.

Safeware through its technical support services and annual regulatory conference SafeCom has for several years been assisting its clients to develop an implementation plan for CLP to ensure business continuity and a seamless introduction of the new system. Of course, we have experienced unprecedented demand over the last 6 months for help and guidance, and we are happy to report that both our regulatory and IT support teams have been able to provide the necessary assistance to ensure our clients meet the deadlines demanded from the regulations.

Now the deadline has past what should customers prepare for in the future?

Safety Data Sheets
Amongst the excitement of the June 1st deadline a revised regulation has been published (EU 2015/830) replacing Annex II of REACH effective from 1st June 2015.
• This regulation adapts minor revisions from the 5th revision of UN GHS for Safety Data Sheets.
• Confirms the revised format for Safety Data Sheets and makes provisions for a phased implementation for compliance

Further revisions to CLP
A proposed 7th ATP to CLP is pending final approval later this year. This revision updates the list of harmonised classifications in CLP (Annex VI) with new entries and revision of existing ones.
The 8th ATP still under discussion makes amends as required by the 5th revision of the UN GHS. color scheme generator There are no dates available for implementation.

Poison Centre – Article 45 CLP updates
The Commission have announced the publication of a cost-benefit study relating to the harmonisation of information to be submitted to Poison Centres.
A working paper/review of potential harmonisation of data requirements has been drafted. The creation of a ‘unique formula identifier’ (UFI) to be included as part of the labelling requirements has been identified as a clear benefit in assisting identification of products during incidents.
The adoption of the UFI represents new costs to industry, but a clear benefit to Poison Centres and patients. The estimated costs presented within the report, are exceeded by the harmonisation savings. how to backup iphone to icloud . The impact of adopting the UFI will be reduced by using a transitional phase and again the cost savings for this element have been provided within the report. The possibility of adopting a group UFI for cases where there are large product ranges with similar compositions is also explored.
The study estimates the positive and negative impacts of a harmonised notification system of data to be transmitted to Poison Centres in accordance with Article 45 of the CLP Regulation.

Note:
Safeware Quasar a leading supplier of expert regulatory software, consultancy solutions, and support services, assesses the CLP implementation for chemical mixtures which incorporates the majority of chemical based aerosols currently manufactured.

Safeware Quasar is a BAMA member and Simon will be presenting at the BAMA Forum on the 15th October 2015.

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BAMA member Crown Aerosols engineers success through its UK Apprentice Scheme

With an increasing number of employers welcoming apprentices as well as Government support for apprentice schemes, there are more opportunities to get inside some of the most exciting and innovative companies in the country.

One of our member companies, CROWN Aerosols UK, has run a successful Apprenticeship Scheme for the past six years. The objective is to attract highly motivated and capable candidates, encourage ‘home-grown’ expertise and retain talented engineering staff.

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

The programme is open to new employees as well as existing Crown staff who are trained in-house to expand basic engineering skills as well as enhance the application of those skills in the workplace. To ensure a well-rounded programme, Crown combines the skills and experience of its own staff along with support from local partner colleges.
Crown Apprentices: Danny Lewis (Aged 24) and Tony Birch (aged 48) both took part in the scheme improving their job prospects and benefiting the company.
Danny’s apprenticeship has run for three and a half years and has included day-release to local colleges to complete external Level 1 and 2 and 3 EAL Diploma in Mechanical Engineering exams. During the apprenticeship, Danny has worked with every department to learn the different skills needed at the Sutton plant. He has recently taken on the role of Can Line Engineer where he is responsible for the smooth running and maintenance of the aerosol line.

Tony Birch applied to be a Crown Apprentice after working with the company for sixteen years. It was a major decision for Tony to apply for the apprenticeship in 2010, as he had a young family and it meant that he leaving his full-time, paid production line job and taking a drop in salary in order to complete the four year course with weekly study leave at College.

Tony was such a good student that he completed the four year course in two and a half years and won the ‘Metals Apprentice of the Year Award’ in 2013 from The Worshipful Company of Tinplate Workers alias Wire Workers. His job now entails making sure the production line runs smoothly: from the welding to checking the quality of the cans, right through to the seams; side striping; cured lacquer and high pressure testing. Completing the apprenticeship has paid off financially as it enabled Tony to earn a higher salary than in his former production line role.

In 2010 Crown won the Social Responsibility category for its Apprentice scheme in the BAMA Awards. These Awards highlight success stories in the aerosols industry, and were created to recognise innovation and continuous improvement in the aerosol sector. For more information on the 2015 Awards visit http://www.bama.co.uk/forum.

BAMA is currently working with Cogent Skills, a training provider, offering BAMA members the expertise in setting up a training/apprenticeship scheme to address your skills shortage. Government funding is available and Cogent can help you access it!

If you are a BAMA member and would like more information, contact Amy Falvey.

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Inclusive design already in evidence for aerosols

Packaging that requires seals to be so tight that they prevent spilling can have the problem that they are hard to open. This is especially true for an ageing population of course, but delivering goods in packaging that is easy for everyone is a valuable goal.

This is where aerosols as a packaging format are so admirable. Aerosols prevent spill and waste yet for most people are easy and quick to operate and deliver just the right amount.

Research by the consumer organisation Which? found that one in five consumers will switch brands if packaging makes it hard to access the contents. So it is incumbent on brand owners to avoid annoyance at best and brand switching at worst.

The European and International Standards for packaging seek to protect the consumer from pack design that is less than perfect. Inclusive Design (ID) where designers build in accessibility and usability without the need for special adaptation or specialised design is now top of the agenda for many FMCG manufacturers and for those who design packaging for them. The British Standards Institute is doing much to encourage packaging design to comply with ease of opening as well as optimal readability of labels.

A good example of this thinking is one of BAMA’s members, Aptar Beauty + Home, which won the Innovation category of the 2014 BAMA Awards for its Runway actuator. So clever is this aerosol trigger accessory that the judges claimed it was: “bordering on revolutionary,” adding: “This brings ease of use for people with restricted movement and for dispensing product in hard-to-reach areas such as one’s back. We foresee a lot of applications.”

Aerosol packaging manufacturers are always considering new means of improvement in this way for what is already a very easy-to-use pack format.

Every 6 months, BAMA publishes a collection of stories about excellence and innovation in aerosol pack design called AEROdynamics. To download the latest copy, click here.

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We should celebrate the UK’s ‘can do’ approach

We were reading a community news feed1 that hit our desks the other day and it stopped us in our tracks.

Even though aerosol cans are easily recyclable – and 90% of people in Australia could recycle them, it seems around two thirds (66%) of Australians aren't sure what to do with them. The figure came up in a recycling report by Planet Ark and was reported by our counterpart organisation, the Aerosol Association of Australia (AAA).

Here in Britain, we often think of Australians as being steps ahead of us when it comes to recycling and sustainability.

Yet despite the good work of the AAA, aerosol cans seem to cause confusion with just one third (33%) of people in Oz correctly identifying them as recyclable; 54% incorrectly say they aren't recyclable; and a further 12% say they aren't sure. With Australians using a staggering 250 million aerosols every year, this means an enormous amount of recyclable high quality steel and aluminium is ending up in landfill.

It just acted as a reminder of how far we in the UK have come. Thanks to campaigns by BAMA such as our ‘Can Do’ Awards for local authorities, along with programmes such as the Alupro campaign, supported by BAMA and others, the majority of councils collect empty aerosols from the kerbside and most consumers know they can recycle them.

It’s salutary to remember that in 2001 just 7% of councils recycled empty aerosols; by 2009, 75% recycled; and by 2014 – over 90% recycled. This means that the 30000 tonnes of reclaimable high-grade metal waste produced via the 600 million aerosols or so used in the UK each year gets reused, not sent to landfill.

The latest research we conducted showed that the overwhelming majority of Brits know they can and should recycle aerosols and that, most importantly, most do. Of those who buy aerosols in the UK, 73% are recycling them.

We in the UK should be proud of this achievement. We’re never complacent; we know you don’t have to be bad to get better. However, we think it’s important sometimes to look back on how far we’ve come – and in the case of recycling aerosols, it’s a very long way indeed.

1. Source: http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/news/item/8d240b9d722d38c.aspx

2. Survey by GfK NOP for BAMA interviewed 1000 adults aged 16+ by telephone launched March 2013.

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Details announced for the BAMA Forum 2015

BAMA (the British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association), is to hold its annual Forum on 15-16 October 2015. The event will again take place at The Belfry Hotel in Sutton Coldfield. The results of the BAMA Awards will also be announced at a gala dinner to be held on 15th October. Both the event and the Awards are open to all BAMA members.

Now in their seventh year, the BAMA Awards recognise and promote the high standards in the UK aerosol industry and are a valuable way of promoting businesses and so all BAMA members who have launched new products or other innovations are encouraged to enrol entries.
Dominic HollandThis year, entertainment will be provided by Dominic Holland (pictured) who has been invited as the guest comedian at this year’s dinner. One of the country’s most highly regarded comedians, Dominic has enjoyed success as both a stand-up comedian and a writer and is often seen as a panellist on shows including Five's The Wright Stuff, Have I Got News For You and Never Mind the Buzzcocks. Dominic has written for the late Bob Monkhouse, Harry Enfield, Lenny Henry and Clive Anderson, as well as being the author of three novels including the critically acclaimed Only In America.
There will be rewards for BAMA members who enter the Awards and prizes worth a total of £3000 for the companies which are picked as winners or runners-up in two of the Awards’ categories.

Companies engaged in any aspect of the aerosol industry but which are not already members of BAMA, may enter the Awards and attend the Forum and gala dinner as long as they have applied for membership and have their application accepted before 7th September, which is the closing date for Awards entries. Entry forms will be available on the BAMA website shortly.

The Members' rate to attend the two-day event is £199 + VAT which includes lunch, the seminars, the Awards Dinner plus accommodation for one night and breakfast. Non-members may not attend the seminars although BAMA welcomes members to invite guests to the Awards Dinner.

If you are not yet a member and believe your company is eligible for membership contact: amyfalvey@bama.co.uk.

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The Appliance of Science

Nick Swift is from The Association of Science Education which runs the website SchoolScience.co.uk. He has been working with BAMA for many years to promote aerosol Science and Technology to schools. Nick is this month’s guest blogger.

Nick SwiftIf you work in the education business you are constantly bombarded by messages from industry, universities and government about the shortage of scientists, engineers and mathematicians. Dozens of websites and schemes are set up to try to solve the problem. None of them do any harm and many are excellent, but all too often they are schemes that will run for a while and then fade away.

The fact is that teachers need to be informed about how science is applied in the real world. I run the website www.schoolscience.co.uk and Twitter account @schoolscience that does just this. We channel scientific news to schools and create original learning resources. Much of science can be dry theory. Our aim is to show how the theory is applied.

When I was asked by BAMA to create teaching resources about aerosols, I jumped at the chance to show how that ubiquitous little can explains a lot of basic science. The index page is here http://www.schoolscience.co.uk/aerosolsindex
To gather the information required took many discusssions with the experts at BAMA and several visits to aerosol companies where I managed to grasp most of the technology. I learned that aerosols look simple and they are simple. The hard part is making billions of them cheaply. Getting into those companies was arranged by BAMA and was crucial to the project. No matter how much internet research you do, there is no substitute for seeing the processes and talking to employees. Some of those employees are featured in the resource.

The resource has to match the science curriculum, so the main issues are vapour pressure, ideal gas pressure, the pressure law, Boyle’s Law and resistance welding. There is a simple treatment of droplet size. Wherever possible, clear pictures and videos have been used. There are question pages and help with pressure units.

The web pages are created in a way that makes the resource editable, so if you have better pictures, more process detail, or any ideas for improving the resource, please get in touch with BAMA and we can look at editing the resource to include them. Comments on the resource are welcome too.

And finally… a story.
Once upon a time I was in Leeds city centre when a new construction project was creating pile foundations. The biggest pile drill I have ever seen was just starting up. Two teenage girls walked past the site entrance. One was awestruck at this massive machine and tried to get her friend to look. Her friend was impatient to get on and never gave the machine a glance. I watched them walk on and wondered if the awestruck girl would study civil engineering, get a £45k starting salary and travel the world.

We can never interest everyone in science and engineering, but giving them access to information at least gives everyone a chance.

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BAMA Guides Members through ‘Red Tape’

BAMA has issued a reminder to members that keeping a close eye on the emerging new rules is crucial to enable companies in the aerosol and retail sectors to stay ahead.

New official ‘red tape’ could make life very difficult for some varieties of aerosols. BAMA believes that what it describes as ‘creeping red tape’ flies in the face of the Government’s ‘Red Tape Challenge’ which seeks to simplify regulations to make trading conditions safe but easier to follow and manage.

Four key regulatory changes affecting aerosols include: the Aerosol Dispensers Directive (ADD), CLP, F-gas II, and COMAH. There is also new guidance on the classification of the waste from the packaging of hazardous goods.

BAMA wants even more companies in the industry to join the Association in order to avoid falling foul of complicated regulatory changes. We’re also encouraging more retailers to stay in touch through BAMA’s Retailer Liaison Group – a service provided free to retailers to give advice on good practice in handling, storing and displaying aerosol products.

Dr Paul Jackson, Technical Director of BAMA, warns us that 2015 will be a year of change and, to some extent, confusion. The Association is not only busy lobbying on behalf of its members, but offering help and advice to them as the changes are introduced. For membership details, visit our website at www.bama.co.uk or telephone 0207 828 5111.

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Staying ‘on course’ this February

BAMA is ‘on course’ to improve training in the industry. Only a month into 2015, we are holding three events to help improve knowledge in the industry. One of BAMA’s key strengths, many members say, is its attention to safety and training. Because our members and potential members are all over the UK, one of the initiatives that we’ve been pursuing is a programme of regional workshops.

In February there are two new courses launching. One is on testing and classification for the Aerosol Dispensers Directive (ADD) and the other on the labelling of aerosols.
Testing and Classification of Aerosols for the ADD – 24th February 2015 is a one day course to train regulatory specialists in how to deal with the classification and safety assessments based on the Aerosol Dispensers Directive.

2015 training course banner

The Labelling of Aerosols – 25th February 2015 will train regulatory specialists in how to label aerosols, looking at the evidence to conclude what is good and bad labelling. The one-day workshop will include process exercises.

If you are responsible for the classification and labelling of aerosols or for advising customers it’s a good idea to attend. Both these courses will be held at BAMA's headquarters in Stevenage and open to members and non-members.

For costs and to book for the events mentioned here, visit our courses page. Please note the Regional Seminar which was due to take place on the 12th February has been cancelled.

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Practical Toolkit introduced to help BAMA Members Plan for the Future

Forum for the FutureWe have just completed a major study undertaken in conjunction with Forum for the Future.

This was a follow up to a similar exercise undertaken in 2001. The Future of Aerosols 2, which has just been completed, has resulted in a practical ‘toolkit’ for sustainability to be used by our member companies in further developing their own future plans and predictions.

The process has involved http://cialisvsviagracomparison.com/ interviews and workshops with around 100 people from within the aerosol industry as well as from allied organisations and individuals.

Industry experts were asked to look back over the past decade or more and also to consider the coming 20-25 years, reviewing social trends, technological changes, economic trends and political factors. The process also asked participants to review both threats and opportunities in the coming years and to consider innovations and predictions.

Sessions have been held to introduce training skills to those who will be facilitating company workshops within their own business.

The 'toolkit' includes worksheets and topic prompts, covering factors that have been identified through the process. Member companies are invited to use these materials to help shape their businesses in to the future and BAMA will help to facilitate workshops, in house, at member offices.

Zoe Le Grand, Senior Sustainability Advisor of Forum for the Future, who led the training workshops said: “The aerosol industry has had to innovate its products in the face of environmental pressures in the past. The Future of Aerosols 2 project helped the BAMA membership to look broadly at a range of social, environmental and economic trends which could affect the industry in the long term and proactively identify responses to them.”

We welcome this kind of future thinking as we believe it offers a huge benefit to our members. It takes us beyond just the day-to-day challenges and helps establish what is truly important and not just what is urgent today, an important part of our role as a Trade Association.

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Apprenticeships…. back in vogue!

Cogent SkillsCogent Skills is the UK’s strategic body for skills in the science industries, led by sector employers. Lesley Coombes, Business Development Manager at Cogent is our guest blogger for July and informs you about the various Apprenticeships available.

We work with employers to develop, design and deploy skills solutions for the science industries. We support organisations engaging in Traineeships, Apprenticeships, industrial placements and graduate training programmes through the development of bespoke company training plans; providing a learning and development solution tailored to the needs of your business.

There are two types of Apprenticeships available – SMART Apprenticeships, which can be Level 2 or Level 3, and Higher Apprenticeships at Level 4 and above.

We are working closely in collaboration with BAMA, and hoping to create a SMART Apprenticeship for the process and manufacturing industries inclusive of additional training relating to the aerosol production by utilising BAMA’s courses. We are also looking to put BAMA through our quality assurance process and to benchmark their work against industry Gold Standards.

SMART Apprenticeships
SMART Apprenticeships put employers in control of the training to ensure that it is in line with the developments of industry, the company and job landing role of the apprentice. Hiring an apprentice can provide your organisation with many benefits:

• Employers have control of designing the standards so that the Apprenticeship responds to the needs of industry and the company.
• New and existing employees are able to learn and develop skills whilst making a positive contribution to the development and output of the company.
• Funding available through the Science Industry Partnership.
• Increased focus on training for the job means that the apprentice must demonstrate their ability through rigorous assessment at the end of their Apprenticeship.

Higher Apprenticeships (HA)
HAs provide employers with an alternative to graduate recruitment and the HA framework contains five pathways; Life Sciences, Chemical Science, Process Development, Packaging Development and Food Science. Hiring a Higher Apprentice can provide organisations with many benefits.

Some of these are:
• Building a diverse workforce with a range of different skills and perspectives;
• Skills are developed that are not only relevant to the science-based industries, but are specific to your business;
• There is the opportunity for science-based companies to receive up to 100% funding when recruiting a Higher Apprentice;
• Filling skills gaps with loyal, motivated members of staff.

If this is an area that you would like more information on and to find out how you can access funding, please contact Amy Falvey by email or on 0207 8285111.

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