Category Archives: BAMA

BAMA Filling Figures 2019

NEW FIGURES ILLUSTRATE AEROSOL INDUSTRY’S RESILIENCE

Statistics announced by the British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (BAMA) reveal 1.521 billion cans were filled in 2019, marking a small drop compared to the previous year’s record performance.
Amidst the uncertainty posed first by Brexit and now by COVID-19, the filling figures for 2019 have been welcomed by industry, reflecting the sector’s resilience and the continued popularity of the aerosol format with consumers.

As in previous years, the personal care sector accounts for the largest volume of products, with anti-perspirants still the biggest seller in this sector and across the industry overall.
BAMA data shows that 484m anti-perspirants were manufactured in 2019, an increase of 7% on 2018 figures while haircare products also saw an increase of 3% pointing to continued innovation, particularly in dry shampoos, with products such as waterless mousses and dry conditioners gaining in popularity.

Patrick Heskins, BAMA Chief Executive, said: “The UK aerosol industry showed it’s resilience despite the uncertainty surrounding trading and political matters throughout 2019.
“In spite of the closure of one of the UK’s major filling companies, and the uncertainties created by the decision to leave the EU, aerosol filling in 2019 only showed a reduction of 1% compared to 2018.
“Looking ahead, COVID-19 presents an altogether different challenge for all of us but the figures prove that the aerosol industry is nothing if not innovative and resilient.”

Production of personal care aerosols continues to dominate UK aerosol manufacturing with more than 74% of the cans filled in this category. The on-going trend for men to sport beards however saw a drop in the production of shaving foams and gels.

Volumes in the household sector remain strong at just over 17% of the total and production of household products into spray cans, particularly air fresheners, increased in 2019. There was also continued growth in the volume of OTC medicines dispensed as aerosols.

The volume of industrial and automotive aerosols filled dropped as a result of some production moving overseas after the closure of McBride in Hull. This, in addition to the drop in shaving preps being filled, caused a shift in the proportion of tinplate and aluminium aerosol cans being used with aluminium now accounting for 57% of the market, up around 7% on last year.

Patrick added: “Aerosols will continue to provide a convenient solution for both commercial and consumer use. I have no doubt we will continue to see sustained growth in the household products and hard surface cleaners for instance, as well as personal care products. Further growth in medical and pharmaceuticals also seems very likely in the years ahead.
“In the face of unprecedented and continued market challenges as well as an uncertain political landscape, the aerosol industry has continued to perform strongly and has clearly demonstrated its significance in UK manufacturing and to the wider economy once again.”

(COVID-19): Free UL safety data sheet for Hand Sanitiser, in the language of your choice

Businesses all over the world are beginning to manufacture hand sanitizers to meet the critical need. For manufacture and shipment of such products, a Safety Data Sheet (SDS) is required, but many new manufacturers lack the expertise to create these required documents.

The World Health Organization (WHO) provides a “Guide to Local Production: WHO-recommended Handrub Formulations” that contains specific formulations for both ethanol-based and isopropanol-based hand sanitizers. Additionally, in the United States, under the current public health emergency the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a “Policy for Temporary Compounding of Certain Alcohol-based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency”.

Following the specifications set forth in these documents, UL has created an SDS for both the ethanol-based and isopropanol-based hand sanitizer formulas that comply with both WHO recommendations and FDA requirements.

UL, states that safety is at the heart of their mission and drives every decision they make. they applaud the many groups who are stepping up to increase the supply of hand sanitizer in their communities and want to make their job easier. UL Safety Data Sheets are available in the relevant regional Globally Harmonized System (GHS) formats, and what’s better, they are currently offering them free of charge.

To obtain your free copy of an SDS, please complete the request form and email your completed request form to the email address provided. You will then receive your Safety Data Sheet in PDF format via email within two business days.
Link to Request form: https://msc.ul.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/UL-WHO-Formula-Hand-Sanitizer-SDS-Request-Form.pdf

EC Guidance on applicable legislation for hand cleaners and hand disinfectants

Guidance on the applicable legislation for leave-on hand cleaners and hand disinfectants (gel, solution, etc.)1

BACKGROUND

Following the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) disease many actions have been carried out in EU to prevent and reduce the transmission of the virus. This includes enhanced hygiene practices. As preventive measure against the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19) disease, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control recommends “Washing of hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or cleaning hands with alcohol-based solutions, gels or tissues is recommended in all settings”.

The use of hand cleaners and hand disinfectants in forms of gels, hand wipes or other leave-on products has increased dramatically in the last weeks and this has resulted in general shortages across most EU countries. Several economic operators, mostly SMEs, are investing/considering to shift production chain and increase production of Hand cleaners and Hand disinfectants to respond to the additional needs in the context of the current Coronavirus crisis. In that sense, we have noticed a steep increase in the submission to the Cosmetics Product Notification Portal under the Cosmetics Regulation (Article 13) and related questions on the applicable legislation. In fact, according to several factors (e.g. claims, composition and purpose of use), hand cleaners and hand disinfectants are subject to different legal frameworks: Cosmetic Products Regulation or Biocidal Products Regulation.

Clear guidance for economic operators on the applicable legislation and related requirements is urgently needed. This guidance is based on existing practices and practical examples. In particular, while normally soap is a cosmetic product, other products such as alcohol-based solutions, gels, hand-cleaners, hand-disinfectants, etc. might require further clarification.

Q1: WHICH ARE THE APPLICABLE EU LEGAL FRAMEWORKS IN THE CASE OF ALCOHOL-BASED SOLUTIONS, GELS, HAND-CLEANERS, HAND-DISINFECTANTS?

These products can be subject either to Cosmetic Products Regulation or Biocidal Products Regulation (normally only one legislation should be applicable to a product).

This depends first of all on the presence of an active substance and the main purpose of the product:

Products supplied with a main or exclusive cosmetic purpose (i.e. cleaning or cleansing the skin notably in absence of water rinsing) are covered by the Cosmetics Regulation.

1 N.B. These Guidelines are intended only to facilitate the application of Regulation (EU) 1223/2009 on cosmetics products, and Regulation (EU) 528/2012. However, the Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to the information in this document. This information is:
• of a general nature only and is not intended to address the specific circumstances of any particular individual or entity;
• not necessarily comprehensive and complete;
• not professional or legal advice.

Products containing an active substance and supplied with a primary biocidal purpose (i.e. intended to control harmful organisms) are not covered by the cosmetics legislation and therefore fall within the scope of the biocides legislation. Examples include products containing an active substance and making a claim to improve public health through the control of infectious organisms, such as “disinfecting”, “kill viruses”, “kill bacteria”, which would go beyond the general perception of personal hygiene and can include antibacterial hand gels.
Therefore:
• When their main purpose is to cleanse or clean the skin they are probably subject to the Cosmetic Products Regulation.
• If no main purpose is declared and such products contain an active substance and are marketed with any claims of biocidal activity or specific effects of reducing cross- contamination, they would be probably subject to the Biocidal Products Regulation.

Q2: WHAT KIND OF CLAIMS WOULD SUPPORT A COSMETIC PURPOSE AND CLASSIFICATION FOR HAND CLEANERS?

Although the claims themselves are not the only decisive factor whether the product should be considered as covered by the Cosmetics Regulation or the Biocidal Products Regulation, they are a relevant indication of the purpose of the product. “Physically clean / visually clean” and “Hand cleaner” are typical claims where the function is in line with the definition of a cosmetic product with respect to cleaning and improving the appearance of the hands or body. The product will have to comply with the Cosmetic Products Regulation.

However, if the product is presented with a claim stating “Hygienically clean” (or similar wording), the function ‘hygiene’ might indicate in this context that it could be considered as biocidal. The term hygiene has a broad spectrum of meaning which range from simple cleanliness to disinfection, depending on the context in which it is used. While in the context of cosmetics, the term normally refers to ‘personal hygiene’, i.e. products for cleaning and keeping in good condition the skin, in a context of biocidal products, the term ‘hygiene’ is associated with ‘disinfection’.

It is therefore important to look at all the characteristics of the product, and in particular its composition, the purpose and the function of the product. If it is clear that the product is mainly intended to protect public health through biocidal action (e.g. disinfecting, antimicrobial/virus function), which would go beyond the general perception of personal hygiene, and the objective criteria for considering such a product as “biocidal product” are fulfilled, the product cannot be considered as a cosmetic product and will have to comply with the Biocidal Products Regulation.

Q3: WHAT KIND OF CLAIMS WOULD PRELIMINARILY SUPPORT A CLASSIFICATION AS BIOCIDAL PRODUCT CLASSIFICATION FOR HAND-CLEANERS AND HAND-DISINFECTANT?

The following list of examples is established solely on the basis of product claims. Claims may be a strong indication of the intended product purpose and will therefore help in forming a preliminary assumption on a product’s regulatory status. However, it is important to assess all the characteristics of the product, including its composition, the purposes of its use and the mode of action on the harmful organism, on a case by case basis before making a final decision.
The following claims would preliminarily suggest that the product is a biocide covered by the Biocidal Products Regulation:

• “Antibacterial”
• “Unique antibacterial formulation.”
• “Kills bacteria”
• “Kill bacteria/a wide range of germs and words having the same meaning”
• “Antiviral” and words having the same meaning
• “Kills viruses, Virokill” and words having the same meaning
• “Effective against flu virus H1N1”
• “Effective against coronavirus”
In these examples, the product clearly makes a claim of general human hygiene through skin disinfection, and hence a claim to protect public health through biocidal action. In this case, the biocidal function is likely to be considered as the main function to which the cosmetic function has become secondary. In consequence, if the product contains an active substance and has the required function, the product would be excluded from the scope of the Cosmetics Products Regulation, and would need to comply with the Biocidal Products Regulation.

Q4: I AM A COMPANY PRODUCING COSMETICS, AND I WANT TO MANUFACTURE “HAND DISINFECTANTS” TO HELP IN THE CONTEXT OF AN EPIDEMIC. WHAT SHALL I DO TO BE ALLOWED TO SUPPLY SUCH “HAND DISINFECTANTS” (ON THE MARKET TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC, TO PROFESSIONALS, TO MEDICAL CARE FACILITIES ETC.)?

The supply of “hand disinfectants” is subject to rules established under the Biocidal Products Regulation. You are advised to contact first the national competent authorities on biocidal products in the Member States where you intend to make such a supply2. These authorities will be able to guide you on steps to follow, in particular to obtain an authorisation or an emergency permit if considered necessary by the Member States.

In particular:

– if your hand disinfectant would contain active substances still under examination in the “review programme” set out in Regulation (EU) No 1062/2014 (see Annex II), your hand disinfectant would have to be placed on the market in the Member States subject to compliance with the national rules, and possible derogation therefrom.
– If your hand disinfectant would contain active substances which have been assessed and approved under the Biocidal Products Regulation, the Member States would normally need to grant an authorisation in accordance with the Regulation. Member States can also grant you an emergency permit under Article 55(1) if they consider it necessary to allow your product on the market especially in the context of the current Covid-19 crisis.

You can check the situation of active substances on the European Chemicals Agency website: https://echa.europa.eu/fr/information-on-chemicals/biocidal-active-substances

Further useful links :

• Information on the cosmetic legislation : https://ec.europa.eu/growth/sectors/cosmetics_en
• Information on the biocidal products legislation :
 https://ec.europa.eu/health/biocides/overview_en
 https://echa.europa.eu/regulations/biocidal-products-regulation
 https://echa.europa.eu/de/contact/bpr
http://echa.europa.eu/web/guest/support/helpdesks/national- helpdesks/list-of-national-helpdesks

2 The list of Member States competent authorities on biocidal products can be found here : https://echa.europa.eu/fr/contacts-of-the-member-state-competent-authorities ;
and here : https://circabc.europa.eu/w/browse/73cc1500-d360-4f43-98be-863713c4dd8d

(COVID-19): The Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) – answers to your questions

WHAT IS THE Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS)?

CBILS is a new scheme that can provide facilities of up to £5m for smaller businesses across the UK who are experiencing lost or deferred revenues, leading to disruptions to their cashflow. CBILS supports a wide range of business finance products, including term loans, overdrafts, invoice finance and asset finance facilities.

The scheme provides the lender with a government-backed guarantee potentially enabling a ‘no’ credit decision from a lender to become a ‘yes’.

Please note: This scheme is just one of a number of measures announced by Government and you can find full details of the temporary, timely and targeted measures to support public services, people and businesses through this period of disruption caused by COVID-19 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-employers-and-businesses-about-covid-19/covid-19-support-for-businesses

WHEN CAN I ACCESS THE SCHEME?

The scheme went live on Monday 23 March and will initially run for six months.

WHAT ARE THE KEY FEATURES of CBILS?

CBILS guarantees facilities up to a maximum of £5m available on repayment terms up to six years for term loans and asset finance. For overdrafts and invoice finance facilities, terms will be up to three years. The scheme provides the lender with a government-backed guarantee against the outstanding facility balance.

There is no guarantee fee for SMEs to access the scheme. The Government will make a Business Interruption Payment to cover the first 12 months of interest payments and any lender-levied fees.[1] You (the SME) will therefore benefit from no upfront costs and lower initial repayments.[2]

At the discretion of the lender, the scheme may be used for unsecured lending for facilities of £250,000 and under. The Big Four banks have agreed that personal guarantees will not be taken as security for lending below £250,000. For facilities above £250,000, the scheme requires the lender to establish a lack or absence of security prior to businesses using CBILS. Primary Residential Property cannot be taken as security under the scheme. If the lender can offer finance on normal commercial terms without the need to make use of the scheme, they will do so.

Please note: It’s important that you are aware that you, the borrower will always remain 100% liable for the debt. The CBILS guarantee is to the lender, not you, the SME.

HOW DO I KNOW WHETHER I’M ELIGIBLE TO APPLY?

Smaller businesses (SMEs) from all sectors[3] can apply for the full amount of the facility, up to a maximum of £5m.

To be eligible for a facility under CBILS, your business must:

Be UK based in its business activity with annual turnover of no more than £45m
Have a borrowing proposal which, were it not for the COVID-19 pandemic, would be considered viable by the lender, and for which the lender believes the provision of finance will enable your business to trade out of any short-to-medium term difficulty
If the lender can offer finance on normal commercial terms without the need to make use of the scheme, they will do so.
One of the eligibility criteria is for the business to have an annual turnover of no more than £45m. Would the £45m turnover threshold be measured on the entirety of the Group or could the funding be taken by a single operating subsidiary? Can the different companies within the group access their “own” guarantee?

If your business is part of a group, controlled on either a legal or de facto basis, the maximum turnover applies to the group undertaking. More than one company within the group can be considered for a CBILS facility but only if the consolidated group turnover does not exceed the £45m annual turnover threshold. The qualifying period is 12 months preceding application.

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION of an SME for the CBIL SCHEME?

Under the CIBL Scheme, the definition of SME is confined to the turnover of an Applicant (or an Applicant’s group) which must not to exceed £45m. The Borrower cannot be an individual other than where the individual is a sole trader or a partner in a partnership and is acting in a business capacity.

HOW CAN I ACCESS THE SCHEME?

CBILS is available through the British Business Bank’s 40+ accredited lenders, which are listed on the British Business Bank website here.

In the first instance, businesses should approach their own provider – ideally via the lender’s website. They may also consider approaching other lenders if they are unable to access the finance they need.

Decision-making on whether you are eligible for CBILS is fully delegated to the 40+ accredited CBILS lenders. These lenders range from high-street banks, to challenger banks, asset-based lenders and smaller specialist local lenders.

Note: if the accredited lender can offer finance on normal commercial terms without the need to make use of the scheme, they will do so.

Additional application notes:

Given there is likely to be a big demand for facilities once the scheme goes live, we ask you to please:

Consider applying via the lender’s website in the first instance. Telephone lines are likely to be busy and branches may have limited capacity to handle enquiries due to social distancing
Consider the urgency of your need – it is possible that some businesses may be looking for regular longer-term finance rather than ‘emergency’ finance, and there may other businesses with a more urgent need to speak with a lender
What are the fees to borrow under CBILS?

There is no guarantee fee for SMEs to use the CBILS scheme.

WHAT TYPES OF FINANCE ARE AVAILABLE and WHO OFFERS WHICH TYPE?

CBILS supports a wide range of business finance facilities, including:

Term loans
Overdrafts
Asset finance
Invoice finance
Note: Not every lender can provide every type of finance listed.

CBILS is available through the British Business Bank’s 40+ accredited lenders, which are listed on the British Business Bank website here.

WHAT TYPES OF BUSINESSES is CBILS FOR?

The scheme is designed to support smaller businesses (SMEs) who don’t meet a lender’s normal lending requirements for a fully commercial loan or other facility, but who are considered viable in the longer-term.

IS THE SCHEME APPROPRIATE FOR Start-ups?

Potentially, if your business activity is primarily UK-based. For early stage businesses in their first two years of trading, the British Business Bank’s Start Up Loans programme (loans £500 to £25,000 at 6% p.a. interest) may be more suitable.

Visit www.startuploans.co.uk for more information.

WILL I NEED SECURITY TO GET a CBILS-backed LOAN?

At the discretion of the lender, the scheme may be used for unsecured lending for facilities of £250,000 and under. The Big Four banks have agreed that personal guarantees will not be taken as security for lending below £250,000. For facilities above £250,000, the scheme requires the lender to establish a lack or absence of security prior to businesses using CBILS. Primary Residential Property (PPR) cannot be taken as security under the scheme.

Note: If the lender can offer finance on normal commercial terms without the need to make use of the scheme, they will do so.

Do I NEED EVIDENCE THAT I HAVE A VIABLE BUSINESS?

Yes. You must show in your borrowing proposal that were it not for the COVID-19 pandemic, your business would be considered viable by the lender, and for which the lender believes the provision of finance will enable your business to trade out of any short-to-medium term difficulty.

I HAVE AN EXISTING EFG Facility WITH MY LENDER THAT I NEED TO DISCUSS. What do I do?

If you have a query about an active EFG facility, you should approach your current provider – ideally via their website, and not the British Business Bank.

ARE THERE ANY RESTRICTIONS ON A BORROWER REFINANCING their EFG Facility to a CBILS Facility?

If you have a query about an active EFG facility, you should approach your own provider – ideally via their website – and not the British Business Bank. Any request for re-financing an existing EFG facility will be at each individual Lender’s discretion, be subject to certain limits, and you meeting the CBILS eligibility criteria.

WHAT’S HAPPENING TO THE OLD Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme (EFG)?

The EFG scheme is temporarily suspended at this point in time. If you wish to apply for a financing facility, your lender will be able to assess if you are eligible under CBILS.

HOW LONG WILL CBILS run for?

CBILS will initially run for 6 months.

WILL THE CBILS funds run out SO I CAN’T ACCESS THE SCHEME?

No. Government has confirmed that the amount of funding available under the scheme will be demand-led. Therefore there is no immediate need to approach a lender if you do not need finance in the short-term. The scheme will initially run for six months.

ARE SOLE-TRADERS / FREELANCERS eligible?

Yes, as long as the business activity is operated through a business account. The scheme is open to sole traders, freelancers, body corporates, limited partnerships, limited liability partnerships or other legal entity carry out a business activity in the United Kingdom, with annual turnover of up to £45m, operating in all sectors[4].

The business must generate more than 50% of its turnover from trading activity.

I HAVE HAD DE MINIMIS AID IN THE PAST, CAN I STILL GET A LOAN?

Yes, as long as you meet the scheme’s eligibility criteria. Any previous de minimis state aid does not impact your eligibility for CBILS and does not need to be taken into account by the Lender. CBILS operates as a notified scheme rather than under de minimis as EFG did. There is no interaction between any de minimis state aid previously received by a business and the size of the CBILS facility they can access, should they be eligible.

I AM GETTING OTHER KIND OF AID TO HELP RESPOND to COVID-19 – CAN I STILL GET A LOAN?

Yes. The eligibility criteria for CBILS does not require Lenders to take into account the other forms of government support that SMEs may be benefiting from e.g. business rate reliefs or grants unrelated to the CBIL scheme.

HOW is CBILS DIFFERENT FROM the EFG SCHEME?

CBILS is a new scheme. It is different from EFG in a number of ways.

* There is no guarantee fee for SMEs to use CBILS. Under EFG, there was a guarantee fee paid by the borrower.
* The Government will make a Business Interruption Payment to cover the interest and any lender-levied fees in the first 12 months of any CBILS facility, so smaller businesses will benefit from no upfront costs and lower initial repayments (originally announced as 6 months). Following earlier discussions with the banking industry, some lenders indicated that they would not charge arrangement fees or early repayment charges to SMEs borrowing under the scheme. HM Government greatly appreciates this approach by lenders.
* The maximum facility provided under CBILS will be up to £5m. Under EFG, this was £1.2m
* At the discretion of the lender the need for security may be waived for facilities below £250,000. * The Big Four banks have agreed personal guarantees will not be taken as security for lending below £250,000. For facilities above £250,000, the scheme requires the lender to establish a lack or absence of collateral prior to businesses using the CBIL Scheme. Primary Residential Property (PPR) cannot be taken as security under the scheme.
* CBILS is for borrowing proposals which, were it not for the current COVID-19 pandemic, would be considered viable by the lender, and for which the lender believes the provision of finance will enable the business to trade out of any short-to-medium term difficulty. The EFG scheme was only for facilities considered viable under the lender’s commercial terms.
* CBILS is available to businesses with annual turnover of no more than £45m. EFG was available to businesses with annual turnover of no more than £41m.

If you have any further questions please contact your current provider, not the British Business Bank.

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[1] Following earlier discussions with the banking industry, some lenders indicated that they would not charge arrangement fees or early repayment charges to SMEs borrowing under the scheme. HM Government greatly appreciates this approach by lenders.

[2] Fishery, aquaculture and agriculture businesses may not qualify for the full interest and fee payment.

[3] The following trades and organisations are not eligible to apply: Banks, Building Societies, Insurers and Reinsurers (but not insurance brokers); The public sector including state funded primary and secondary schools; Employer, professional, religious or political membership organisation or trade unions.

[4] The following trades and organisations are not eligible to apply: Banks, Building Societies, Insurers and Reinsurers (but not insurance brokers); The public sector including state funded primary and secondary schools; Employer, professional, religious or political membership organisation or trade unions.

COVID-19 Cleaning PPE

COVID-19: cleaning in non-healthcare settings

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
1. cleaning an area with normal household disinfectant after someone with suspected coronavirus (COVID-19) has left will reduce the risk of passing the infection on to other people
2. wherever possible, wear disposable or washing-up gloves and aprons for cleaning. These should be double-bagged, then stored securely for 72 hours then thrown away in the regular rubbish after cleaning is finished
3. using a disposable cloth, first clean hard surfaces with warm soapy water. Then disinfect these surfaces with the cleaning products you normally use. Pay particular attention to frequently touched areas and surfaces, such as bathrooms, grab-rails in corridors and stairwells and door handles
4. if an area has been heavily contaminated, such as with visible bodily fluids, from a person with coronavirus (COVID-19), consider using protection for the eyes, mouth and nose, as well as wearing gloves and an apron
5. wash hands regularly with soap and water for 20 seconds, and after removing gloves, aprons and other protection used while cleaning

BACKGROUND
Experience of new coronaviruses (SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV) has been used to inform this guidance. The risk of infection depends on many factors, including:
* the type of surfaces contaminated
* the amount of virus shed from the individual
* the time the individual spent in the setting
* the time since the individual was last in the setting

The infection risk from coronavirus (COVID-19) following contamination of the environment decreases over time. It is not yet clear at what point there is no risk. However, studies of other viruses in the same family suggest that, in most circumstances, the risk is likely to be reduced significantly after 72 hours.

PRINCIPLES OF CLEANING AFTER THE CASE HAS LEFT THE AREA
Personal protective equipment (PPE)
The minimum PPE to be worn, for cleaning an area where a person with possible or confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) is or has been, is disposable gloves and an apron. Hands should be washed with soap and water for 20 seconds after all PPE has been removed.

If a risk assessment of the setting indicates that a higher level of virus may be present (for example, where unwell individuals have slept, such as a hotel room or boarding school dormitory) or there is visible contamination with body fluids, then the need for additional PPE to protect the cleaner’s eyes, mouth and nose might be necessary. The local Public Health England (PHE) Health Protection Team (HPT) can advise on this.

CLEANING AND DISINFECTION
Public areas where a symptomatic individual has passed through and spent minimal time, such as corridors, but which are not visibly contaminated with body fluids can be cleaned thoroughly as normal.

All surfaces that the symptomatic person has come into contact with must be cleaned and disinfected, including:
* objects which are visibly contaminated with body fluids
* all potentially contaminated high-contact areas such as bathrooms, door handles, telephones, grab-rails in corridors and stairwells

Use disposable cloths or paper roll and disposable mop heads, to clean all hard surfaces, floors, chairs, door handles and sanitary fittings, following one of the options below:
* use either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1,000 parts per million available chlorine
OR
* a household detergent followed by disinfection (1000 ppm av.cl.). Follow manufacturer’s instructions for dilution, application and contact times for all detergents and disinfectants
OR
* if an alternative disinfectant is used within the organisation, this should be checked and ensure that it is effective against enveloped viruses

!Avoid creating splashes and spray when cleaning!

Any cloths and mop heads used must be disposed of and should be put into waste bags as outlined below.

When items cannot be cleaned using detergents or laundered, for example upholstered furniture and mattresses, steam cleaning should be used.

Any items that are heavily contaminated with body fluids and cannot be cleaned by washing should be disposed of.

LAUNDRY
Wash items in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest water setting and dry items completely. Dirty laundry that has been in contact with an unwell person can be washed with other people’s items.

Do not shake dirty laundry, this minimises the possibility of dispersing virus through the air.

Clean and disinfect anything used for transporting laundry with your usual products, in line with the cleaning guidance above.

WASTE
Waste from possible cases and cleaning of areas where possible cases have been (including disposable cloths and tissues):
* should be put in a plastic rubbish bag and tied when full.
* the plastic bag should then be placed in a second bin bag and tied.
* it should be put in a suitable and secure place and marked for storage until the individual’s test results are known.

Waste should be stored safely and kept away from children.
You should NOT put your waste in communal waste areas until negative test results are known (or the waste has been stored for at least 72 hours).
– if the individual tests negative, this can be put in with the normal waste
– if the individual tests positive, then store it for at least 72 hours and then place it with the normal waste

If storage for at least 72 hours is not appropriate, arrange for collection as a Category B infectious waste either by your local waste collection authority if they currently collect your waste or otherwise by a specialist clinical waste contractor. They will supply you with orange clinical waste bags for you to place your bags into so the waste can be sent for appropriate treatment.

Manufacture of Biocidal Hand Sanitiser -DEROGATION (COVID-19)

MANUFACTURE AND SUPPLY OF BIOCIDAL HAND SANITISER PRODUCTS DURING THE OUTBREAK: coronavirus (COVID-19)

Some of the UK’s existing manufacturers of biocidal hand sanitiser products have reported that they are facing significant challenges to their normal supply chains from increasing demand for the raw ingredients needed to meet unprecedented and urgent demand during the Covid-19 outbreak.

In response HSE has taken the following steps.

* DEROGATION FROM PRODUCT AUTHORISATION REQUIREMENTS FOR HAND SANITISERS CONTAINING Propan-2-ol
Article 55 (1) of the Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR) enables HSE, in cases of danger to public health, animal health or the environment which cannot be contained by other means, to provide short term derogations from the requirements for product authorisation.

Biocidal hand sanitiser products containing Propan-2-ol (also known as isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol/IPA), will not be required to obtain a product authorisation if they meet the relevant WHO-specified formulation II (PDF)- Portable Document Format.

Manufacturers wishing to place products that meet the WHO specified formulation onto the UK Market must contact HSE via biocidesenquiries@hse.gov.uk using ‘Propan-2-ol Article 55’ as the subject title of the email. HSE will respond quickly to request details about the products being manufactured and once provided, issue a derogation certificate.

Products should not be placed on the market until HSE has confirmed that the derogation applies to you and issued you with the certificate.

* HAND SANITISERS CONTAINING Propan-1-ol OR Ethanol
WHO does not specify a formulation for hand sanitisers containing propanol-1-ol. Therefore, although Article 55 derogations may be possible for hand sanitisers containing propan-1-ol, these will require more information from applicants to enable HSE to determine their efficacy and the risks associated with their use. Such applications will take longer to process than those for hand sanitisers containing propan-2-ol.

There is a WHO-specified formulation for hand sanitiser containing ethanol(https://www.who.int/gpsc/5may/Guide_to_Local_Production.pdf). Under the transition arrangements in the biocidal product regulations manufacturers do not require product authorisations to place hand sanitiser products containing ethanol on to the UK Market.

* RULES FOR SUPPLYING CHEMICALS FOR USE IN BIOCIDAL PRODUCTS
Article 95 of the BPR aims to create a level playing field across industry by ensuring that all suppliers of biocidal products have paid a share of the cost of supporting the active substance dossier through an evaluation process.

Article 95 requires suppliers of active substances for use in biocidal products to have obtained a letter of access to an active substance dossier, to have submitted their own dossier to the European Chemicals Agency, or to be a participant in the European Commission’s on-going review programme of active substances.

There are currently 44 companies recognised under Article 95 for supplying propan-2-ol as a biocidal active substance, including 4 based in the UK. In addition, there are currently 98 companies recognised under Article 95 for supplying the alcohol ethanol as a biocidal active substance, including 7 based in the UK.

The sources are listed on the European Chemical’s Agency’s (ECHA) searchable database: https://echa.europa.eu/information-on-chemicals/active-substance-suppliers

* NON-ARTICLE 95 SUPPLIER’S CHEMICALS FOR USE IN HAND SANITISER
During this exceptional time of increased demand due to the coronavirus outbreak, it may be necessary for hand sanitiser manufacturers to find alternative suppliers of raw ingredients to supplement those obtained via regular supply chains.

HSE’s primary concern is that safe and effective biocidal hand sanitisers are available in the UK to help protect people during the coronavirus outbreak. HSE will adopt a pragmatic and proportionate approach to regulatory requirements that relate to supply chain obligations during this period. The focus of any HSE activity by inspectors will be to ensure that products on the market are effective in combating the coronavirus and do not pose an unacceptable risk to people or the environment.

HSE would expect product manufacturers to have taken all reasonable steps to source ingredients in such a way that they are compliant with Article 95 obligations.

However, HSE Inspectors will take a sensible and proportionate approach if they come across hand sanitisers that are not strictly in line with normal BPR supply chain requirements under Article 95, recognising the urgent wider need for safe and effective products.

In making commercial decisions, manufacturers need to be mindful of maintaining high levels of safety and efficacy of the products they make available to the public and others.

* ACTIVE SUBSTANCES NOT YET SUBJECT TO AUTHORISATION UNDER THE BIOCIDAL PRODUCTS REGULATIONS
Suppliers of hand disinfectants and sanitisers should bear in mind that where the product is not yet subject to authorisation under the BPR, eg those containing ethanol, any product placed on the market must comply with other relevant legislation on Classification, Labelling and Packaging of substances and Mixtures (CLP) and other general product safety regulations.

Any workplace producing or using or storing ethanol and isopropyl alcohol must also comply with relevant health and safety regulations.

* HAND SANITISERS THAT DON’T CONTAIN ALCOHOL
This guidance relates to alcohol-based hand sanitisers.

Other active substances are available but Public Health England has advised that hand sanitisers should have 60% or higher alcohol content to be effective against the COVID-19 virus.

Further information and advice
* speak to your supplier
* contact biocidesenquiries@hse.gov.uk
* sign up to the biocides e-bulletin: https://www.hse.gov.uk/news/subscribe/index.htm
* visit the HSE Biocides website: https://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/index.htm

(COVID-19): support package for your workforce

The Chancellor outlined on 20th March an unprecedented package of measures to protect millions of people’s jobs and incomes as part of the national effort in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

A new Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme will be set up to help pay people’s wages. Employers will be able to contact HMRC for a grant to cover most of the wages of their workforce who remain on payroll but are temporarily not working during the coronavirus outbreak. Any employer in the country- small or large, charitable or non-profit will be eligible for the scheme.

Universal Credit and tax credits will also be increased as part of an almost £7 billion welfare boost, as he outlined one of the most generous business and welfare packages by any government so far in response to Covid-19.

To ease cash flow pressures for UK VAT registered businesses, VAT bills from now until the end of June, will be deferred until the end of the tax year.

* UK workers of any employer who is placed on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme can keep their job, with the government paying up to 80% of a WORKER’S WAGE, up to a total of £2,500 per worker each month. These will be backdated to 1st March and will be initially open for 3 months, to be extended if necessary.
* VAT payments due between now and the end of June will be DEFERRED. No VAT registered business will have to make a VAT payment normally due with their VAT return to HMRC in that period. INCOME TAX PAYMENTS due in July 2020 under the Self Assessment system will be DEFERRED to January 2021, benefitting up to 5.7m self-employed businesses.
* Additionally, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, launched at Budget, will now be INTEREST FREE for TWELVE months.
* The standard rate in Universal credit and Tax Credits will be increased by £20 a week for one year from April 6th, meaning claimants will be up to £1040 better off.
* Nearly £1bn of additional support for RENTERS, through increases in the generosity of housing benefit and Universal Credit. From April, Local Housing Allowance rates will pay for at least 30% of market rents in each area.
HMRC are working night and day to get the unprecedented Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme up and running and we expect THE FIRST GRANTS TO BE PAID WITHIN WEEKS.

BAMA announces appointment of new Vice Chair

The British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (BAMA) has announced the appointment of Peter Watmough, global detection products manager at Cascade Technologies, a division of Emerson Automation Solutions, as Vice-Chair of the Association.
Peter will take over from James Smith, Summit Europe, who has served as Vice-Chair of BAMA since 2018.

With several years of experience on the BAMA board of directors, Mr Watmough’s focus will be centred on helping the association to deliver its 2025 strategy, expanding the membership base and sharing knowledge with stakeholders across an increasing diverse range of industries.

Patrick Heskins, BAMA chief executive, said: “Peter brings a wealth of industry experience and technical know-how to the role and I am very pleased to welcome him as the new Vice-Chairman.

“The coming year is likely to present many new challenges with significant political upheaval and the anticipated changes in the regulatory landscape. Peter’s experience will be critical in supporting BAMA’s members as the association works to ensure their voices are heard at all levels.”

“I would like to thank James for his support during the last 18 months and throughout a period of great uncertainty for the industry.”

Peter Watmough commented: “Despite the varied challenges facing industry, the UK remains the largest filler in Europe, the third largest in the world and will continue to make a very significant contribution to the UK economy as we move into a new decade.
“As every business strives to operate as efficiently as possible, it is likely that we will see greater need for the services of associations like BAMA, particularly to ensure regulatory changes do not have adverse or unintended consequences. I will work closely with the BAMA team and membership to ensure the association remains well placed to provide the resources and support required and respond effectively to any issues the industry faces whether local or global.”

Blockchain technology

‘Blockchain’ – what is it and why do we care?

Chances are you’ve probably heard of blockchain – and you’ve almost certainly heard that it’s going to be the next big thing. You’ve been told that it could transform the way that both your business and the market work. However, more likely than not, you are in the dark as what all the fuss is about and how this is going to happen.
That’s because this technology is at a very early stage in its development and few can assess realistically what it can actually deliver. In fact the first blockchain was only created in 2009 as part of the development of the crypto-currency Bitcoin.
So what actually is blockchain, and is it really as important as many people have made out?

The DEFINITION of BLOCKCHAIN
A blockchain is a type of distributed ledger, which records a series of transactions as digital records or ‘blocks’. What makes it unique is that these blocks are inextricably linked, despite not being stored in the same place. This makes the records secure, because there isn’t a central source to be attacked and the records can be made unique and permanent. They can’t be altered without the changes themselves being recorded.

Blockchain was a breakthrough technology for crypto-currencies, because it could be used globally and prevent anyone spending the same unit of currency twice. For a business, it creates a way of maintaining a unique, indisputable history of all its interactions with different parties: suppliers, partners, customers and ensure the traceability and integrity of its data.

HOW can BUSINESSES use Blockchain?
Proponents of blockchain have latched on to its transparency as a solution to every problem facing businesses, from supply chain management to micropayments. However, as with so many breakthrough technologies, blockchain can’t bring about these changes by itself. It’s the systems and applications built around it that will drive real impact.

Certain applications are straightforward. For example, a company could use blockchain to store details of its unique product formulation. The production line at a filler, for instance, would automatically stop and alert management, when a discrepancy was detected against the original records – any change a third party (hacker, malaware) attempted would be spotted before damage could take place.

Transforming DATA QUALITY and DATA OWNERSHIP
It’s not just the management of data that blockchain could change, though. Potentially far more significant are the implications of the technology for ownership and control of proprietary data.
Looking at the chemical industry, blockchain could take this out of the hands of manufacturing partners – and put it into the hands of the owners whom the data relates to. This is critical when brand and public image are at stake and the supply chain behind a marketer is large, fragmented and possibly outsourced. Any change of hands brings with it a risk, the more severe the risk, the higher the level of security required. For patented products and registered trade marks, avoiding counterfeit is paramount and a switch towards higher security, control and integrity, certainly worth the investment behind it.

WHERE are we in the PROCESS?
Aspects of this huge transformation are already happening. The UK government’s Midata project, for instance, has made financial services companies and energy suppliers store their data in a form that customers could access and share with other providers. One of the major barriers to large-scale adoption of the personal information economy has been the technology required to create secure, personal data stores. If blockchain solves that problem, then the relationship between people and data could be transformed, and marketing could be on the verge of a revolution.

BAMA unveils winners at annual awards

The British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (BAMA) has announced the winners of its annual awards at the 2019 Forum and Awards Dinner, with Simply Breathe, Ball Aerosol Packaging and Triple Line Technology among the recipients.

Held at the prestigious Oulton Hall Hotel, Leeds, the awards recognise and reward innovation across the aerosol sector.

Winners, runners up and highly commended entrants were selected from five categories:
• Aerosol Packaging
• Sustainability
• Process Safety and Training
• Aerosol of the Year
• Aerosol in Action, photography.

The awards were judged by an esteemed panel of experts, including Ben Carpenter-Merritt, Policy Manager, Manufacturing at Policy Connect, Olga Munroe, Head of the Retail Institute, and Detlev Melcher, Publisher and CEO of Media Service International

Commending the winners, the judges said: “The standard of entries at this year’s awards demonstrates the industry’s continued commitment to innovate at each stage of the supply chain.

“The quality of work showcased across each of the award categories made selecting eventual winners no mean feat, and stands as testament to how far the industry has come in driving sustainable growth across the sector”.

The winners and runners up in each category were:

Aerosol Packaging

Winner: Ball Aerosol Packaging – Ball Aluminium Aerosol 360° Can
360 technology offers symmetrical and asymmetrical shaping available over the full circumference of the can. Artwork is oriented to perfectly fit the relief area and complement the shaping, resulting in a can that is visually engaging from all angles while providing additional grip for usability.

Runner up: Pritchard Spray Technology Ltd – Deft Household Cleaning Range
Deft combines the benefits of aerosol with Anyway Spray® technology and zero emissions propellant delivering a world beating new product format & sophisticated packaging design.

Highly Commended: Coster Group – Texture effects on actuator
Coster realised a new way of conceiving the actuator where personalisation is related to the eye catching effect and not to the shape, by creating patterns on the actuator surfaces. Infinite effects choice are available on every Coster actuator and spray cap

Sustainability

Winner: Triple Line Technology – TLT foam dispenser
TLT-foamer technology is a low-cost and easy to implement innovation with the potential to significantly reduce the total volume of VOCs or nitrous oxide released to the atmosphere, enabling the development of a wide range of sustainable foamed aerosol products.

Runner up: Procter & Gamble – 100% Polymer Aerosol
A 100% polymer aerosol container developed to meet the needs of consumers while assuring safety and functionality and striving for recyclability. This innovation is the first aerosol container which attempts to meet the needs of both the aerosol and recycling industries.

Highly commended: COSTER – COSTER plan for sustainable growth
COSTER’s 2018 Sustainability Report demonstrates a commitment to sustainability, achieved by putting in place a group-wide improvement plan and monitoring system that gives a transparent, objective and measurable overview of the progress year on year.

Process Safety and Training

Winner: Unilever – Unilever Process Safety
The process safety management programme is paramount to Unilever’s sustainable business in aerosol manufacture, and has resulted in external auditors deeming Unilever Leeds as a site with sustained, outstanding process safety management performance.

Runner up: Alloway UK Ltd – AP Vision System
A vision and control system that uses a single camera to check that product and/or perfume has been injected into the can correctly. Working at up to 500 cans per minute, the system will identify faulty containers before the valve is inserted, meaning they can be reworked rather than scrapped.

Highly commended: WD-40 Company – Smart Stack
Specially designed for retailers, Smart Stack is shop ready packaging which requires no handling. Once In store, retailers need only open the external cover–protector for the stack to be display ready. No further preparation required.

Aerosol of the Year

Winner: Simply Breathe Limited – AirForLife® – Emergency Escape Device
AirForLife® is an emergency escape device, embodied in an aerosol packaging assembly, which provides the user with a self-contained oxygen supply to aid in the escape from incidents such as a burning building or other situations in which breathing may become impaired.

Runner up: Church & Dwight Europe – Batiste Waterless Cleanser Range
Waterless Cleansing Foam comes in four variants: Cleanse & Shine, Cleanse & Strengthen, Cleanse & Smooth, Cleanse & Hydrate. This innovation is a game changer in the dry shampoo industry, giving the consumers a shower like cleaning experience in a Dry Shampoo.

Runner up: James Briggs Ltd – Hycote Graphene Anti-Corrosion Primer
Specifically developed to provide excellent resistance to corrosion, Hycote graphene primer is the only aerosol primer using graphene in production today. Performing significantly better than a standard primer, Hycote graphene primer withstood more than 1,750 hours of standardised salt-spray corrosion testing, compared to standard primer which showed signs of damage as early as 168 hours.

Highly commended: Pritchard Spray Technology Ltd – Deft Household Cleaning Range
Deft combines the benefits of an aerosol with Anyway Spray® technology, zero emissions propellant and 99.6% VOC free ingredients delivering a world beating new product format and sophisticated packaging design.

Aerosol in Action, photography:

Winner: Pritchard Spray Technology Ltd
The winning image will be used as the cover of the 2020 BAMA Annual Report. In addition, the photographer behind the image will receive a yearly membership to the Guild of Photographers.

Special Recognition Award

Winner: Grant Coupland – Sustainability Director, Colep
Recognised by board members for his contribution to the industry, Grant was a key figure in the creation of ACOA – an alliance between Colep, Pax in Australia and Diazo in Japan. Prior to his current role, Grant worked for CCL in Scunthorpe and remained with the company following its merger with Colep. In addition, Grant has sat on the BAMA Committee, held the position of Chairman of the Association, and currently represents BAMA on the FEA Board of Directors.

Patrick Heskins, BAMA chief executive, said: “Congratulations to the winners, runners up and all those who were highly commended and of course a huge thank you to all those who entered the 2019 awards.

“While we have we seen a record number of entries this year, what’s been most impressive is the breadth and standard of the products submitted.

“It’s been great to see the aerosol industry addressing some of the biggest social issues of the last few years. In AirForLife we have an incredible innovation that has the potential to save many lives”.

In addition to free publicity and a trophy, the winners in each of the five categories received a £500 voucher, redeemable against any of the many BAMA events or products. The runner ups in each category also received a £250 voucher.