Category Archives: Transport

Extract: Michael Gove’s staged implementation of border controls

From Michael Gove’s Statement to the House, on EU Exit preparations

The new technology that we’re introducing will allow us to monitor with far greater precision exactly who, and what, is coming in and out of our country.

The Border Operating Model that we published today (13 July) provides clarity about the end-to-end journeys of goods on the move between Great Britain and the EU, including information about controlled goods and the new government systems that will support future trade.

It is important to note that the Border Operating Model does not cover matters relating specifically to the Northern Ireland Protocol.

In the light of coronavirus, and in order to give business and industry more time to adjust – we announced last month that border controls would be introduced in THREE STAGES up to 1 July 2021.

– In the FIRST PHASE, from January 2021, traders importing standard goods will need to prepare for basic customs requirements. Full Customs Declarations will be needed for controlled and excise goods such as alcohol and tobacco products. But people importing standard goods will have up to six months to make their declaration and to pay tariffs. Traders moving goods using the Common Transit Convention will need to follow all of the transit procedures.

– In the SECOND PHASE, from April 2021, we’ll require all products of animal origin, regulated plants and plant products to have pre-notification and the relevant health documentation. Any physical checks will continue to be conducted at the point of destination.

– And in the THIRD and final PHASE, from July 2021, traders moving all goods will have to make full customs declarations at the point of importation and of course pay relevant tariffs. Checks for animals, plants and their products will take place at Border Control Posts in Great Britain.

!!! Regulation Update!!!

Luckily or not we are still within the EU, and the checks of goods crossing our national borders haven’t yet tighten as most people expected them to. Depending on what the situation will be in November, things might well change and give us few more loops to jump through.
While the political elite gets through its umpteenth scuffle, business has to continue, trade must go on, and we all have to comply with the requirements of an ever changing regulation.
That, at least, is something BAMA can help you with.
On the subject of transport (by road, sea, train or air), we already know that aerosols are classed as ‘dangerous goods’and the transport regulations require that any shipment, including samples, must be properly declared and adequately packaged by staff that are ‘appropriately trained’ to the current legal requirements.
Said requirements have recently changed, to a limited extent but enough for BAMA to have to amend its 2017 Guide to the Transport of Aerosols, to make sure it still delivers you the most up-do-date requirements.
The 13th edition of the BAMA Guide to Transport is 100 pages (and you thought it was a marginal topic) of knowledge, distilled in an easy to follow format, with graphs and tables to facilitate understanding and to simplify reference searches at any stage.
It explains how to consign aerosols for transport, according to the mode you have chosen (rail, road, sea or air). It covers the classification, packaging, testing, marking and labelling requirements in each case and it explains what documentation is required.
The Guide includes the UN model regulations; it also tells you what sort of training is considered ‘appropriate’.
It is free to download for BAMA members, so you really have no excuses I’m afraid (we can liven things up with face-to-face training, though – just ask).