Tag Archives: BAMA Courses

Warehousing and transporting aerosols requires guarantees of compliance and safety

Paul Jackson, Technical DirectorSome training can be an optional extra; whilst other types of training deliver health, safety or even the future security of your company’s business.

BAMA is justifiably proud of its work over several decades to raise standards and improve safety in the aerosol industry. Apart from the manufacturing of aerosols, we also attend to safety throughout the supply chain. For companies that handle, store or transport aerosols, we offer training that is an essential ‘must do’ part of their operation.

BAMA offers accurate, sophisticated and up to date information, training at a level that helps with compliance and offers peace of mind. Our one-day training seminars on consigning aerosols for transport and on warehousing are generally regarded to be exemplary of their kind.

Because of our desire to improve safety, we don’t limit our training to Members but make it available to anyone in any company or organisation that might need it. The next round of seminars will take place this month and will be held in Stevenage.

As one delegate put it: “The transport/warehousing courses run by BAMA are a fantastic way of ensuring your business is familiar and up to date with the requirements for storing and transporting aerosols. What makes it even more useful is having access to the experts at BAMA in the room who encourage discussion and bring clarity to the already complicated legislation in place”.

The transport regulations require ‘appropriate training’ for personnel consigning aerosols for transport and these are updated on a two year cycle. This means that people should refresh their training every few years. According to the Department for Transport ‘appropriate training’ for consigning aerosols is provided at the BAMA transport seminar.

Transporting aerosols – 18 May 2016
Aerosols are classed as ‘dangerous goods’ for transport and the transport regulations require that any shipment of aerosol goods, including samples, must be properly declared and adequately packaged by staff that are ‘appropriately trained’ to the current regulations

This course delivers an understanding of how the regulations for the transport of dangerous goods are developed by the UN and applied to the transport modes (i.e. for road, rail, sea and air).

The course is aimed at employees involved in the consignment of aerosols for transport in the UK and internationally and provides them with the appropriate training to fulfil the requirements of ADR (road), RID (rail), and IMDG (sea). It also gives an understanding of what is needed to consign aerosols for transport by air.

A certificate and the latest edition of the BAMA Transport Guide are issued to those who attend.
Non Members Price: £350.00 +VAT
BAMA Members Price: £150.00 +VAT

Warehousing aerosols – 26th May 2016
This one day seminar will provide expert guidance on how to assess and minimise the risks of storing filled aerosols and how to comply with current legislative requirements. The course is designed for anyone involved in storing filled aerosols throughout the supply chain, including third party warehousing and retail regional distribution centres.

A certificate, a set of six warehouse posters and the latest edition of the BAMA Warehousing Guide are issued to those who attend.
Non Members Price: £250.00 +VAT
BAMA Members Price: £125.00 +VAT

Members of the UK Warehousing Association have access to this course at the BAMA Member rate.

For further details on the course click here.

Dr Paul Jackson, Technical Director

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The Appliance of Science

Nick Swift is from The Association of Science Education which runs the website SchoolScience.co.uk. He has been working with BAMA for many years to promote aerosol Science and Technology to schools. Nick is this month’s guest blogger.

Nick SwiftIf you work in the education business you are constantly bombarded by messages from industry, universities and government about the shortage of scientists, engineers and mathematicians. Dozens of websites and schemes are set up to try to solve the problem. None of them do any harm and many are excellent, but all too often they are schemes that will run for a while and then fade away.

The fact is that teachers need to be informed about how science is applied in the real world. I run the website www.schoolscience.co.uk and Twitter account @schoolscience that does just this. We channel scientific news to schools and create original learning resources. Much of science can be dry theory. Our aim is to show how the theory is applied.

When I was asked by BAMA to create teaching resources about aerosols, I jumped at the chance to show how that ubiquitous little can explains a lot of basic science. The index page is here http://www.schoolscience.co.uk/aerosolsindex
To gather the information required took many discusssions with the experts at BAMA and several visits to aerosol companies where I managed to grasp most of the technology. I learned that aerosols look simple and they are simple. The hard part is making billions of them cheaply. Getting into those companies was arranged by BAMA and was crucial to the project. No matter how much internet research you do, there is no substitute for seeing the processes and talking to employees. Some of those employees are featured in the resource.

The resource has to match the science curriculum, so the main issues are vapour pressure, ideal gas pressure, the pressure law, Boyle’s Law and resistance welding. There is a simple treatment of droplet size. Wherever possible, clear pictures and videos have been used. There are question pages and help with pressure units.

The web pages are created in a way that makes the resource editable, so if you have better pictures, more process detail, or any ideas for improving the resource, please get in touch with BAMA and we can look at editing the resource to include them. Comments on the resource are welcome too.

And finally… a story.
Once upon a time I was in Leeds city centre when a new construction project was creating pile foundations. The biggest pile drill I have ever seen was just starting up. Two teenage girls walked past the site entrance. One was awestruck at this massive machine and tried to get her friend to look. Her friend was impatient to get on and never gave the machine a glance. I watched them walk on and wondered if the awestruck girl would study civil engineering, get a £45k starting salary and travel the world.

We can never interest everyone in science and engineering, but giving them access to information at least gives everyone a chance.

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Staying ‘on course’ this February

BAMA is ‘on course’ to improve training in the industry. Only a month into 2015, we are holding three events to help improve knowledge in the industry. One of BAMA’s key strengths, many members say, is its attention to safety and training. Because our members and potential members are all over the UK, one of the initiatives that we’ve been pursuing is a programme of regional workshops.

In February there are two new courses launching. One is on testing and classification for the Aerosol Dispensers Directive (ADD) and the other on the labelling of aerosols.
Testing and Classification of Aerosols for the ADD – 24th February 2015 is a one day course to train regulatory specialists in how to deal with the classification and safety assessments based on the Aerosol Dispensers Directive.

2015 training course banner

The Labelling of Aerosols – 25th February 2015 will train regulatory specialists in how to label aerosols, looking at the evidence to conclude what is good and bad labelling. The one-day workshop will include process exercises.

If you are responsible for the classification and labelling of aerosols or for advising customers it’s a good idea to attend. Both these courses will be held at BAMA's headquarters in Stevenage and open to members and non-members.

For costs and to book for the events mentioned here, visit our courses page. Please note the Regional Seminar which was due to take place on the 12th February has been cancelled.

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Apprenticeships…. back in vogue!

Cogent SkillsCogent Skills is the UK’s strategic body for skills in the science industries, led by sector employers. Lesley Coombes, Business Development Manager at Cogent is our guest blogger for July and informs you about the various Apprenticeships available.

We work with employers to develop, design and deploy skills solutions for the science industries. We support organisations engaging in Traineeships, Apprenticeships, industrial placements and graduate training programmes through the development of bespoke company training plans; providing a learning and development solution tailored to the needs of your business.

There are two types of Apprenticeships available – SMART Apprenticeships, which can be Level 2 or Level 3, and Higher Apprenticeships at Level 4 and above.

We are working closely in collaboration with BAMA, and hoping to create a SMART Apprenticeship for the process and manufacturing industries inclusive of additional training relating to the aerosol production by utilising BAMA’s courses. We are also looking to put BAMA through our quality assurance process and to benchmark their work against industry Gold Standards.

SMART Apprenticeships
SMART Apprenticeships put employers in control of the training to ensure that it is in line with the developments of industry, the company and job landing role of the apprentice. Hiring an apprentice can provide your organisation with many benefits:

• Employers have control of designing the standards so that the Apprenticeship responds to the needs of industry and the company.
• New and existing employees are able to learn and develop skills whilst making a positive contribution to the development and output of the company.
• Funding available through the Science Industry Partnership.
• Increased focus on training for the job means that the apprentice must demonstrate their ability through rigorous assessment at the end of their Apprenticeship.

Higher Apprenticeships (HA)
HAs provide employers with an alternative to graduate recruitment and the HA framework contains five pathways; Life Sciences, Chemical Science, Process Development, Packaging Development and Food Science. Hiring a Higher Apprentice can provide organisations with many benefits.

Some of these are:
• Building a diverse workforce with a range of different skills and perspectives;
• Skills are developed that are not only relevant to the science-based industries, but are specific to your business;
• There is the opportunity for science-based companies to receive up to 100% funding when recruiting a Higher Apprentice;
• Filling skills gaps with loyal, motivated members of staff.

If this is an area that you would like more information on and to find out how you can access funding, please contact Amy Falvey by email or on 0207 8285111.

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