Tag Archives: BAMA Forum

Three reasons to attend the BAMA Forum and Awards 2017 event

Why should you attend this annual event?
As we move into August, with Autumn just around the corner, we are very pleased to be turning our attention to the upcoming BAMA Forum and Awards in October. Already, we’ve put together a packed agenda which includes expert speakers, networking opportunities and an exciting program of entertainment.

With so many reasons to attend this year, it’s difficult to consider why you wouldn’t want to come along. But in case you were in any doubt, we have put together three reasons why attending this year is a good decision:

1. Network with the experts. It’s not often that experts from so many different sectors are under one roof at the same time. Invited to our event this year are guests from a range of different aerosol businesses, as well as speakers from the fields of consumer behaviour, recycling systems, the circular economy, packaging and technology.
As an association, we recognise the importance for businesses to keep up to speed in a world driven by continual political, technological and environmental developments. As well as opportunities for members to network during the conference period of this event, our drinks reception and dinner platforms are also aimed to provide ALL guests with a relaxed and professional arena where ideas and views can be exchanged and connections made.

2. Wine tasting! If you’ve ever wondered about the art of wine tasting or would like to add to your existing knowledge of this famed fermented grape juice then who better to enlighten you than former BBC 2 Food and Drink series presenter and wine connoisseur, Jilly Goolden?
During the drinks reception, Jilly will be sharing her enthusiasm and knowledge on the crispness, body and aroma of selected wines from around the world. Following the wine tasting there will be a four course meal followed by some surprise entertainment!

3. Industry knowledge and recognition If you are a BAMA member, you are invited to listen to presentations from a range of different speakers who will be sharing their thoughts on the aerosol industry from their own unique viewpoints. The diverse speaker line-up will provide our audience with a wide and informed view of where the aerosol industry is right now and where it will be in the future.
With just a month left until the entry deadline, members are invited to submit their entries to be in the running to win. Winning entries will receive industry recognition, press coverage and vouchers worth up to £500 for winners and £250 for runners-up in each of four categories.

BAMA Forum and Awards Dinner details
The BAMA Forum and Awards Dinner will be held at Oulton Hall, Leeds on the 18th & 19th October with both members and non-members invited to the evening dinner on the 18th. Members can attend the conference and submit award entries also. For further information please contact Amy Falvey or visit the BAMA website to book your place.

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BAMA Launches 2016 Awards

2015 Aerosol of the Year Winners - Swallowfield plc & PZ Cussons Ltd with Dominic Holland, Patrick Heskins & Amy Falvey

2015 Aerosol of the Year Winners – Swallowfield plc & PZ Cussons Ltd with Dominic Holland, Patrick Heskins & Amy Falvey

Now in our eighth year, the BAMA Awards always provides a fantastic opportunity to showcase some of the latest innovations within the aerosol industry and highlight many of the UK’s success stories. The Awards Gala Dinner also provides an excellent opportunity for networking within the industry.

This year we have introduced some new categories following feedback from last year’s judging process.

The new categories include:
• New Aerosol of the Year
• Process Safety and Training
• Sustainability
• Aerosol Packaging.

There will also be a ‘Lifetime Achievement Award’ nominated by the BAMA Executive Committee.

The Awards will be presented on the evening of 19th October 2016 at The Belfry Hotel in Sutton Coldfield. Members and their guests will be entertained by the acclaimed comedian, former policeman and raconteur, Alfie Moore, a popular after-dinner speaker.

Companies engaged in any aspect of the aerosol industry but which are not already members of BAMA, may enter the Awards and apply to attend the Forum and Gala Dinner as long as they have applied for membership and have had their application accepted before 7th September 2016 – which is the closing date for entries. The entry form is now available to download from the BAMA website and is open to all BAMA members at: www.bama.co.uk/forum.

Patrick Heskins, Chief Executive of BAMA, says: “The UK aerosol industry continues to go from strength to strength. The BAMA Awards helps to recognise the hard work and endeavour of the industry in important areas such as Innovation and Sustainability. I look forward to seeing another set of high quality submissions from members.”

To book your place at the 2016 BAMA Forum & Awards, please visit http://www.bama.co.uk/training.php or email amyfalvey@bama.co.uk.

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Details announced for the BAMA Forum 2015

BAMA (the British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association), is to hold its annual Forum on 15-16 October 2015. The event will again take place at The Belfry Hotel in Sutton Coldfield. The results of the BAMA Awards will also be announced at a gala dinner to be held on 15th October. Both the event and the Awards are open to all BAMA members.

Now in their seventh year, the BAMA Awards recognise and promote the high standards in the UK aerosol industry and are a valuable way of promoting businesses and so all BAMA members who have launched new products or other innovations are encouraged to enrol entries.
Dominic HollandThis year, entertainment will be provided by Dominic Holland (pictured) who has been invited as the guest comedian at this year’s dinner. One of the country’s most highly regarded comedians, Dominic has enjoyed success as both a stand-up comedian and a writer and is often seen as a panellist on shows including Five's The Wright Stuff, Have I Got News For You and Never Mind the Buzzcocks. Dominic has written for the late Bob Monkhouse, Harry Enfield, Lenny Henry and Clive Anderson, as well as being the author of three novels including the critically acclaimed Only In America.
There will be rewards for BAMA members who enter the Awards and prizes worth a total of £3000 for the companies which are picked as winners or runners-up in two of the Awards’ categories.

Companies engaged in any aspect of the aerosol industry but which are not already members of BAMA, may enter the Awards and attend the Forum and gala dinner as long as they have applied for membership and have their application accepted before 7th September, which is the closing date for Awards entries. Entry forms will be available on the BAMA website shortly.

The Members' rate to attend the two-day event is £199 + VAT which includes lunch, the seminars, the Awards Dinner plus accommodation for one night and breakfast. Non-members may not attend the seminars although BAMA welcomes members to invite guests to the Awards Dinner.

If you are not yet a member and believe your company is eligible for membership contact: amyfalvey@bama.co.uk.

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Waitrose Gives Top Tips

clare photo2The importance of suppliers trying to see things through the retailers’ eyes was one of the key messages that members of BAMA at the 2014 Forum heard when Clare Norman, Waitrose Technical Manager for Household, Baby & Pets, presented her topic – ‘The future of aerosols – a retailer perspective’.

Ms Norman explained that Waitrose customers expect the stores to offer something different, so suppliers need to think of the bigger picture.  One way for suppliers to succeed is by offering something exclusive in the UK – perhaps selling the same concept in Europe but allowing Waitrose to offer that point of difference.

The presentation covered a number of retail topics including the importance of keeping the aerosol offer compelling, to keep up with customer expectations, through differentiation whilst minimising the impact of legislation and environmental perceptions.

She highlighted the ethos behind Waitrose, and went on to discuss challenges faced by the retailer and aerosol manufacturers, including the transportation of aerosols becoming more complex and the requirements of additional legal text on product.

Ms Norman said that new initiatives in aerosols will always be considered if the offer is compelling. “The challenges of increased and complex legislation regarding the transport of aerosols from the EU can be viewed as beneficial to UK manufacturers of aerosols selling in Britain.  This benefit should be maximised when talking to Waitrose as the Company is particularly interested in responsible sourcing, and sourcing from the UK,” she told BAMA members and their guests at the Forum.

The presentation also stressed that retailers were now keen to help act as the customers’ conscience. “The industry should all play their part in promoting to consumers that empty-aerosols are recyclable by looking to carry the message on packs and in-store,” Ms Norman advised.

Clare Norman represents Waitrose on The BAMA Retail Liaison Group which consists of technical representatives from many of the UK’s major retailers including several of the largest grocery, pharmacy and DIY groups. rackspace cloud . color palette .

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Colour & Design

stephen_westlandAerosol packaging is an ever evolving design challenge. Designers and brand owners are always keen to make the pack designs fresh, appealing, sustainable and difficult to copy or counterfeit. All consumer good packaging must have shelf-appeal of course; but for aerosols, where people cannot smell or touch the product before they purchase, the need for clear communication on the pack is all the more important.

So the members of BAMA at the 2014 Forum listened with interest to what said the eminent colour scientist, Professor Stephen Westland (above) from the School of Design at the University of Leeds.

He said that colour management and colour meaning are important issues for packaging experts to bear in mind. Perception of colour is what matters for brands, products and packaging.

“A  shaving foam might be ‘white’ but the differing shades of white matter to the perception of the user,” said Prof Westland.

He was overwhelmed by the interest generated.  Companies realise that although they’re doing well they could perhaps do better, by developing a greater understanding of colour psychology.

Colours can be perceived differently when juxtaposed against other colours  – so that a shade of white will look more or less bright when placed against other colours.

Colours also have different meanings to different individuals or groups of people  depending on our innate reaction to colour, the social economic mores and cultural traditions,  with differing geographical and cultural patterns affecting perceptions of colour. For instance, in Western countries, white is associated with purity, health, weddings, and has clean and innocent connotations; elsewhere white is worn for funerals and has very different meanings.

Despite the cultural difference across the globe, he showed research indicating that the preferred colour across the world is blue. “However, just because one colour is your personal favourite, doesn’t mean that you would only select packaging with that colour,” he explained.  “Red is almost universally the colour of danger and blood. However, many products, especially those that contain berry fruits, successfully sell just because they are red. In some countries, and at particular times of the year, red is associated with holidays, happiness and weddings. Context is all important. translations . There is nothing simple about colour perception,” he said.

Prof Westland said, in the future, he could envisage big data gathering and analysing colour perceptions and preferences, so that companies could appeal in a very tailored way to particular customer groups or even individual consumers.

Even now, as Stephen Westland has said, colour perception and branding is not simple; as we are bombarded with even more sources of online visuals in addition to images in the physical world, colour science is, perhaps, about to become even more complex.

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