Tag Archives: British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association

Jonathon Porritt, leading environmentalist and campaigner, praises the aerosol sector

Fourteen years ago, sustainability and aerosols would have been unlikely to have been seen by most people as a natural partnership. Today, Jonathon Porritt, the campaigning British environmentalist, perhaps best known for his championing of Green issues, his advocacy of the Green Party and Founder Director of Forum for the Future, has written the Foreword to our latest publication ‘Aerosols in Figures’.

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt writes: “…aerosols have a number of sustainability benefits: they are generally made of high quality, recyclable metal; they avoid any excessive use of preservatives, as they keep products clean and hygienic; they avoid waste and spills; and the latest developments in compression and reduced pack sizes are laudable.

“In addition, BAMA has played a very positive role in promoting recycling, both at the kerbside and at council recycling centres”.

He also recognises the valuable contribution our industry plays in the economy. “It’s worth reminding people that the aerosol industry in the UK is also a manufacturing ativan online https://canadianpharmacyonline.org/product/ativan/ success story, with significant exports which continue to make a strong contribution to the UK economy. None of which provides any excuse for complacency!”, he adds.

The green credentials of the sector have been continuously improving over time. Fourteen years ago, just over a quarter of Local Authorities were recycling household rubbish (27%) with fewer than 7% including aerosols in their recycling schemes.

We are proud that, today, over 96% of Local Authorities recycle aerosols; and many have got behind our campaigns to encourage more consumers to include empty aerosols in household recycling efforts.

The figures speak for themselves;

• Local Council Empty-Aerosol Recycling
In 2001 – just 7% included empty aerosols
By 2006 – 75% included empty aerosols.
By 2012 – 87% included empty aerosols.
By 2015 – over 96% include empty aerosols in their recycling schemes

If you would like to view the ‘Aerosols in Figures’ booklet in full it is free and available to download, or to request a printed copy, email BAMA's Administrator Liane Heskins.

Back

A survey for BAMA finds that the aerosol format appeals to 9 out 10 consumers.

woman - recyclingWe were delighted to see that the vast majority of consumers – 92% – say they buy or use aerosols which we discovered via the results of a recent on-line omnibus survey undertaken for BAMA by research consultancy, Populus.

We found that 9 out of 10 people who buy or use aerosols have particular reasons for doing so and really understand some of the key and unique benefits.
92% agreed aerosols were easy to use;
86% said they are easy to direct just where you want the product to go;
80% thought they were airtight, clean and hygienic;
79% thought they were efficient;
78% agreed they make no mess or spills; and
75% liked the fact that they are sealed so cannot be contaminated.

People were pretty good at recycling too. Of those who buy or use aerosols, when asked what they do with empty containers, 68% recycle at the kerbside with household recycling; and 9% take their empty aerosols to a can bank.

When asked what kind of aerosols people recycle, deodorants / antiperspirants come out top, not surprisingly as this is one of the most popular categories in the market, with 85% of recyclers citing these products. Air fresheners are also sustainably handled after use by households that recycle, with 72% in this sector saying they include empty aerosol air fresheners in their household recycling.

We were interested to see the differences in recycling empty aerosols across the UK. Of those who buy or use aerosols, the top cities for recycling were: Hull (78%), Cardiff (73%), Manchester (71%); and Birmingham (69%).

If you have any questions relating to the recent survey, contact Communications & Office Manager – Amy Falvey.

Back

What do bikes and aerosols have in common?

The Brompton Bicycle company’s spokesman was interviewed on Radio 4’s Today Programme recently bemoaning the lack of talent emerging from the UK’s schools and colleges. There is an engineering skills shortage.

Bama1-071b_AdjustedAnd so it is in the aerosol industry. We reported in our May blog on what one member company is doing to tackle the shortage. Introducing an actively managed and highly effective apprentice scheme is something that many companies across the aerosol manufacturing stream are doing.

It’s that time of year when young people en masse are considering their future careers. As A level results are announced and GCSEs are anticipated eagerly, now is a timely moment for manufacturers in the aerosol and other chemical or technical industries to open their doors – and youngsters’ eyes – to the possibilities offered by a career in industry.

For those young people with a long summer holiday ahead of them who may for a variety of reasons not to go to university or further education, an apprentice scheme could be just the answer.

At the SCS (Society of Cosmetic Scientists) Scrub Up on Science competition finals at the Science Museum the other day, a member of the BAMA team met some 13 year old finalists who were passionate scientists, dedicated to pursuing their goals later in life and thrilled to have made some personal care products by using their impressive scientific knowledge.

Not all young people are as focused. Schools no doubt do their best but, as one school teacher said, ‘Science has a poor reputation in many schools. It’s just not seen as ‘cool’”.

So industry needs to do what perhaps schools cannot achieve and reach out to young people to show them that there is a variety of careers – at all levels in a manufacturing company – which they might consider. So whether it’s testing equipment or valves; can-making or filling; design or marketing… July and August could be a good time to promote the career opportunities within our wonderful sector.

As the latest filling figures showed, up again for the 4th successive year, the aerosol sector is vibrant and thriving and needs new applicants to keep it so.

If your company is looking to set up an apprenticeship scheme, please contact Amy Falvey for information on how BAMA can assist you.

Back

Inclusive design already in evidence for aerosols

Packaging that requires seals to be so tight that they prevent spilling can have the problem that they are hard to open. This is especially true for an ageing population of course, but delivering goods in packaging that is easy for everyone is a valuable goal.

This is where aerosols as a packaging format are so admirable. Aerosols prevent spill and waste yet for most people are easy and quick to operate and deliver just the right amount.

Research by the consumer organisation Which? found that one in five consumers will switch brands if packaging makes it hard to access the contents. So it is incumbent on brand owners to avoid annoyance at best and brand switching at worst.

The European and International Standards for packaging seek to protect the consumer from pack design that is less than perfect. Inclusive Design (ID) where designers build in accessibility and usability without the need for special adaptation or specialised design is now top of the agenda for many FMCG manufacturers and for those who design packaging for them. The British Standards Institute is doing much to encourage packaging design to comply with ease of opening as well as optimal readability of labels.

A good example of this thinking is one of BAMA’s members, Aptar Beauty + Home, which won the Innovation category of the 2014 BAMA Awards for its Runway actuator. So clever is this aerosol trigger accessory that the judges claimed it was: “bordering on revolutionary,” adding: “This brings ease of use for people with restricted movement and for dispensing product in hard-to-reach areas such as one’s back. We foresee a lot of applications.”

Aerosol packaging manufacturers are always considering new means of improvement in this way for what is already a very easy-to-use pack format.

Every 6 months, BAMA publishes a collection of stories about excellence and innovation in aerosol pack design called AEROdynamics. To download the latest copy, click here.

Back

We should celebrate the UK’s ‘can do’ approach

We were reading a community news feed1 that hit our desks the other day and it stopped us in our tracks.

Even though aerosol cans are easily recyclable – and 90% of people in Australia could recycle them, it seems around two thirds (66%) of Australians aren't sure what to do with them. The figure came up in a recycling report by Planet Ark and was reported by our counterpart organisation, the Aerosol Association of Australia (AAA).

Here in Britain, we often think of Australians as being steps ahead of us when it comes to recycling and sustainability.

Yet despite the good work of the AAA, aerosol cans seem to cause confusion with just one third (33%) of people in Oz correctly identifying them as recyclable; 54% incorrectly say they aren't recyclable; and a further 12% say they aren't sure. With Australians using a staggering 250 million aerosols every year, this means an enormous amount of recyclable high quality steel and aluminium is ending up in landfill.

It just acted as a reminder of how far we in the UK have come. Thanks to campaigns by BAMA such as our ‘Can Do’ Awards for local authorities, along with programmes such as the Alupro campaign, supported by BAMA and others, the majority of councils collect empty aerosols from the kerbside and most consumers know they can recycle them.

It’s salutary to remember that in 2001 just 7% of councils recycled empty aerosols; by 2009, 75% recycled; and by 2014 – over 90% recycled. This means that the 30000 tonnes of reclaimable high-grade metal waste produced via the 600 million aerosols or so used in the UK each year gets reused, not sent to landfill.

The latest research we conducted showed that the overwhelming majority of Brits know they can and should recycle aerosols and that, most importantly, most do. Of those who buy aerosols in the UK, 73% are recycling them.

We in the UK should be proud of this achievement. We’re never complacent; we know you don’t have to be bad to get better. However, we think it’s important sometimes to look back on how far we’ve come – and in the case of recycling aerosols, it’s a very long way indeed.

1. Source: http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/news/item/8d240b9d722d38c.aspx

2. Survey by GfK NOP for BAMA interviewed 1000 adults aged 16+ by telephone launched March 2013.

Back

Details announced for the BAMA Forum 2015

BAMA (the British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association), is to hold its annual Forum on 15-16 October 2015. The event will again take place at The Belfry Hotel in Sutton Coldfield. The results of the BAMA Awards will also be announced at a gala dinner to be held on 15th October. Both the event and the Awards are open to all BAMA members.

Now in their seventh year, the BAMA Awards recognise and promote the high standards in the UK aerosol industry and are a valuable way of promoting businesses and so all BAMA members who have launched new products or other innovations are encouraged to enrol entries.
Dominic HollandThis year, entertainment will be provided by Dominic Holland (pictured) who has been invited as the guest comedian at this year’s dinner. One of the country’s most highly regarded comedians, Dominic has enjoyed success as both a stand-up comedian and a writer and is often seen as a panellist on shows including Five's The Wright Stuff, Have I Got News For You and Never Mind the Buzzcocks. Dominic has written for the late Bob Monkhouse, Harry Enfield, Lenny Henry and Clive Anderson, as well as being the author of three novels including the critically acclaimed Only In America.
There will be rewards for BAMA members who enter the Awards and prizes worth a total of £3000 for the companies which are picked as winners or runners-up in two of the Awards’ categories.

Companies engaged in any aspect of the aerosol industry but which are not already members of BAMA, may enter the Awards and attend the Forum and gala dinner as long as they have applied for membership and have their application accepted before 7th September, which is the closing date for Awards entries. Entry forms will be available on the BAMA website shortly.

The Members' rate to attend the two-day event is £199 + VAT which includes lunch, the seminars, the Awards Dinner plus accommodation for one night and breakfast. Non-members may not attend the seminars although BAMA welcomes members to invite guests to the Awards Dinner.

If you are not yet a member and believe your company is eligible for membership contact: amyfalvey@bama.co.uk.

Back

Practical Toolkit introduced to help BAMA Members Plan for the Future

Forum for the FutureWe have just completed a major study undertaken in conjunction with Forum for the Future.

This was a follow up to a similar exercise undertaken in 2001. The Future of Aerosols 2, which has just been completed, has resulted in a practical ‘toolkit’ for sustainability to be used by our member companies in further developing their own future plans and predictions.

The process has involved http://cialisvsviagracomparison.com/ interviews and workshops with around 100 people from within the aerosol industry as well as from allied organisations and individuals.

Industry experts were asked to look back over the past decade or more and also to consider the coming 20-25 years, reviewing social trends, technological changes, economic trends and political factors. The process also asked participants to review both threats and opportunities in the coming years and to consider innovations and predictions.

Sessions have been held to introduce training skills to those who will be facilitating company workshops within their own business.

The 'toolkit' includes worksheets and topic prompts, covering factors that have been identified through the process. Member companies are invited to use these materials to help shape their businesses in to the future and BAMA will help to facilitate workshops, in house, at member offices.

Zoe Le Grand, Senior Sustainability Advisor of Forum for the Future, who led the training workshops said: “The aerosol industry has had to innovate its products in the face of environmental pressures in the past. The Future of Aerosols 2 project helped the BAMA membership to look broadly at a range of social, environmental and economic trends which could affect the industry in the long term and proactively identify responses to them.”

We welcome this kind of future thinking as we believe it offers a huge benefit to our members. It takes us beyond just the day-to-day challenges and helps establish what is truly important and not just what is urgent today, an important part of our role as a Trade Association.

Back

Apprenticeships…. back in vogue!

Cogent SkillsCogent Skills is the UK’s strategic body for skills in the science industries, led by sector employers. Lesley Coombes, Business Development Manager at Cogent is our guest blogger for July and informs you about the various Apprenticeships available.

We work with employers to develop, design and deploy skills solutions for the science industries. We support organisations engaging in Traineeships, Apprenticeships, industrial placements and graduate training programmes through the development of bespoke company training plans; providing a learning and development solution tailored to the needs of your business.

There are two types of Apprenticeships available – SMART Apprenticeships, which can be Level 2 or Level 3, and Higher Apprenticeships at Level 4 and above.

We are working closely in collaboration with BAMA, and hoping to create a SMART Apprenticeship for the process and manufacturing industries inclusive of additional training relating to the aerosol production by utilising BAMA’s courses. We are also looking to put BAMA through our quality assurance process and to benchmark their work against industry Gold Standards.

SMART Apprenticeships
SMART Apprenticeships put employers in control of the training to ensure that it is in line with the developments of industry, the company and job landing role of the apprentice. Hiring an apprentice can provide your organisation with many benefits:

• Employers have control of designing the standards so that the Apprenticeship responds to the needs of industry and the company.
• New and existing employees are able to learn and develop skills whilst making a positive contribution to the development and output of the company.
• Funding available through the Science Industry Partnership.
• Increased focus on training for the job means that the apprentice must demonstrate their ability through rigorous assessment at the end of their Apprenticeship.

Higher Apprenticeships (HA)
HAs provide employers with an alternative to graduate recruitment and the HA framework contains five pathways; Life Sciences, Chemical Science, Process Development, Packaging Development and Food Science. Hiring a Higher Apprentice can provide organisations with many benefits.

Some of these are:
• Building a diverse workforce with a range of different skills and perspectives;
• Skills are developed that are not only relevant to the science-based industries, but are specific to your business;
• There is the opportunity for science-based companies to receive up to 100% funding when recruiting a Higher Apprentice;
• Filling skills gaps with loyal, motivated members of staff.

If this is an area that you would like more information on and to find out how you can access funding, please contact Amy Falvey by email or on 0207 8285111.

Drinking lots of your immune system in a specific. Fully review your comments will help reduce reflux and let healthline editorial Team medically reviewed by george krucik viagra vs sildenafil md published on, any illnesses. Members medications for informational purposes and any medications it s symptoms within one or tightly enough weakened les that. Brian (krans) Medically reviewed on December – 22 2014 by.

Back