Tag Archives: Consumer Packaging

BAMA News Update

We are pleased to announce the return of our regular monthly blogs to keep you abreast of all our news. As there has been so much happening in the world of BAMA and indeed, in the aerosol industry, we wanted to bring you up-to-date on some of the activity over the past six months, including welcoming of new members, the latest industry developments and upcoming BAMA events.

New members
Firstly, let’s talk members. We are delighted to announce that this year, we have brought on board nine new BAMA members from a range of different sectors including labelling, waste management and contract packaging & logistics, bringing us up to 84 members. We are on our way to meeting our goal of 100 members by the end of 2018!
New members include:
• Springfield Solutions
• Grundon Waste Management
• Lemonpath Contract Packing and Logistics
• Sarten Packaging
• Lisam Systems Ltd
• Melpass Ltd
• Emissco Ltd
• Exponent International
• Airpure International Ltd.

Australia reciprocal agreement (see image)
As well as welcoming new members, in March this year, to demonstrate our commitment to international trade, BAMA signed a reciprocal agreement with the Aerosol Association of Australia. We believe that this relationship will offer great benefits to members of both associations, particularly with the anticipated growth of the aerosol export market following the UK’s vote to leave the EU.

Innovation Day

And let’s not forget our BAMA Innovation Day held in April at Manchester’s Science and Industry Museum – a great backdrop for the inspiring innovations we learned about on the day.
Speakers came from all over Europe to share and discuss their latest innovations, addressing the need for greater sustainability, driving cost efficiencies and maximising marketing opportunities.
Patrick Heskins talked about the BAMA Standard, the essential ‘cradle to grave’ point of reference for companies involved with the aerosol industry wanting to know more about aerosol design, supply, manufacturing, labelling and transportation.
Feedback from the day was extremely positive and we are already planning a bigger and better event for 2018. We hope you will join us!

Upcoming events
Looking to the future, there are lots of exciting things happening including our exhibition and speaking slot at the ADF conference in New York this September where BAMA’s membership and communications manager, Amy Falvey will be talking about the Future of Aerosols 2 project, the latest industry filling figures and the UK aerosol market.
Later on in the year, we will be hosting our 2017 BAMA Forum and Awards Dinner at Oulton Hall in Leeds. The event is set to be our best yet with a variety of different speakers giving their views on a variety of topics. We have already received some strong award entries from our members and are expecting even more before the 8th September deadline.
Finally, with the appointment of our new marketing and communications agency, Pelican Communications who specialise in packaging communications, we are looking forward to a very busy year promoting the industry and BAMA in new areas, enhancing perceptions of the aerosol as a sustainable packaging format, providing advice on safety standards and good manufacturing practice, plus, promoting the industry’s view to legislators, the media and key opinion formers.

Remember, whether you’re a member or not, if you have any feedback, suggestions or just want to chat – we’d love to hear from you.

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CLP Regulations – are you compliant?

Simon RobinsonSimon Robinson, Director at Safeware Quasar is this month's guest blogger.

The highly publicised June 1st deadline for CLP implementation of chemical mixtures finally arrived this Monday, to the best of my knowledge we all survived and life carried on regardless. So in reality what has changed and how can we expect the regulatory landscape to evolve over the next few years?

The Classification Labelling and Packaging regulations EC No. 1272/2008 which implements the new global system for classifying chemicals and mixtures in Europe entered its final implementation phase for the classification and labelling of mixtures. This Regulation aligns previous EU legislation on classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals to the GHS (Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals).

The CLP Regulation was published in the Official Journal 31 December 2008 and entered into force on 20 January 2009. The deadline for substance classification according to the new rules was the 1st December 2010 and for mixtures a deadline of the 1st June 2015.

Safeware through its technical support services and annual regulatory conference SafeCom has for several years been assisting its clients to develop an implementation plan for CLP to ensure business continuity and a seamless introduction of the new system. Of course, we have experienced unprecedented demand over the last 6 months for help and guidance, and we are happy to report that both our regulatory and IT support teams have been able to provide the necessary assistance to ensure our clients meet the deadlines demanded from the regulations.

Now the deadline has past what should customers prepare for in the future?

Safety Data Sheets
Amongst the excitement of the June 1st deadline a revised regulation has been published (EU 2015/830) replacing Annex II of REACH effective from 1st June 2015.
• This regulation adapts minor revisions from the 5th revision of UN GHS for Safety Data Sheets.
• Confirms the revised format for Safety Data Sheets and makes provisions for a phased implementation for compliance

Further revisions to CLP
A proposed 7th ATP to CLP is pending final approval later this year. This revision updates the list of harmonised classifications in CLP (Annex VI) with new entries and revision of existing ones.
The 8th ATP still under discussion makes amends as required by the 5th revision of the UN GHS. color scheme generator There are no dates available for implementation.

Poison Centre – Article 45 CLP updates
The Commission have announced the publication of a cost-benefit study relating to the harmonisation of information to be submitted to Poison Centres.
A working paper/review of potential harmonisation of data requirements has been drafted. The creation of a ‘unique formula identifier’ (UFI) to be included as part of the labelling requirements has been identified as a clear benefit in assisting identification of products during incidents.
The adoption of the UFI represents new costs to industry, but a clear benefit to Poison Centres and patients. The estimated costs presented within the report, are exceeded by the harmonisation savings. how to backup iphone to icloud . The impact of adopting the UFI will be reduced by using a transitional phase and again the cost savings for this element have been provided within the report. The possibility of adopting a group UFI for cases where there are large product ranges with similar compositions is also explored.
The study estimates the positive and negative impacts of a harmonised notification system of data to be transmitted to Poison Centres in accordance with Article 45 of the CLP Regulation.

Note:
Safeware Quasar a leading supplier of expert regulatory software, consultancy solutions, and support services, assesses the CLP implementation for chemical mixtures which incorporates the majority of chemical based aerosols currently manufactured.

Safeware Quasar is a BAMA member and Simon will be presenting at the BAMA Forum on the 15th October 2015.

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Inclusive design already in evidence for aerosols

Packaging that requires seals to be so tight that they prevent spilling can have the problem that they are hard to open. This is especially true for an ageing population of course, but delivering goods in packaging that is easy for everyone is a valuable goal.

This is where aerosols as a packaging format are so admirable. Aerosols prevent spill and waste yet for most people are easy and quick to operate and deliver just the right amount.

Research by the consumer organisation Which? found that one in five consumers will switch brands if packaging makes it hard to access the contents. So it is incumbent on brand owners to avoid annoyance at best and brand switching at worst.

The European and International Standards for packaging seek to protect the consumer from pack design that is less than perfect. Inclusive Design (ID) where designers build in accessibility and usability without the need for special adaptation or specialised design is now top of the agenda for many FMCG manufacturers and for those who design packaging for them. The British Standards Institute is doing much to encourage packaging design to comply with ease of opening as well as optimal readability of labels.

A good example of this thinking is one of BAMA’s members, Aptar Beauty + Home, which won the Innovation category of the 2014 BAMA Awards for its Runway actuator. So clever is this aerosol trigger accessory that the judges claimed it was: “bordering on revolutionary,” adding: “This brings ease of use for people with restricted movement and for dispensing product in hard-to-reach areas such as one’s back. We foresee a lot of applications.”

Aerosol packaging manufacturers are always considering new means of improvement in this way for what is already a very easy-to-use pack format.

Every 6 months, BAMA publishes a collection of stories about excellence and innovation in aerosol pack design called AEROdynamics. To download the latest copy, click here.

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BAMA Guides Members through ‘Red Tape’

BAMA has issued a reminder to members that keeping a close eye on the emerging new rules is crucial to enable companies in the aerosol and retail sectors to stay ahead.

New official ‘red tape’ could make life very difficult for some varieties of aerosols. BAMA believes that what it describes as ‘creeping red tape’ flies in the face of the Government’s ‘Red Tape Challenge’ which seeks to simplify regulations to make trading conditions safe but easier to follow and manage.

Four key regulatory changes affecting aerosols include: the Aerosol Dispensers Directive (ADD), CLP, F-gas II, and COMAH. There is also new guidance on the classification of the waste from the packaging of hazardous goods.

BAMA wants even more companies in the industry to join the Association in order to avoid falling foul of complicated regulatory changes. We’re also encouraging more retailers to stay in touch through BAMA’s Retailer Liaison Group – a service provided free to retailers to give advice on good practice in handling, storing and displaying aerosol products.

Dr Paul Jackson, Technical Director of BAMA, warns us that 2015 will be a year of change and, to some extent, confusion. The Association is not only busy lobbying on behalf of its members, but offering help and advice to them as the changes are introduced. For membership details, visit our website at www.bama.co.uk or telephone 0207 828 5111.

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Colour & Design

stephen_westlandAerosol packaging is an ever evolving design challenge. Designers and brand owners are always keen to make the pack designs fresh, appealing, sustainable and difficult to copy or counterfeit. All consumer good packaging must have shelf-appeal of course; but for aerosols, where people cannot smell or touch the product before they purchase, the need for clear communication on the pack is all the more important.

So the members of BAMA at the 2014 Forum listened with interest to what said the eminent colour scientist, Professor Stephen Westland (above) from the School of Design at the University of Leeds.

He said that colour management and colour meaning are important issues for packaging experts to bear in mind. Perception of colour is what matters for brands, products and packaging.

“A  shaving foam might be ‘white’ but the differing shades of white matter to the perception of the user,” said Prof Westland.

He was overwhelmed by the interest generated.  Companies realise that although they’re doing well they could perhaps do better, by developing a greater understanding of colour psychology.

Colours can be perceived differently when juxtaposed against other colours  – so that a shade of white will look more or less bright when placed against other colours.

Colours also have different meanings to different individuals or groups of people  depending on our innate reaction to colour, the social economic mores and cultural traditions,  with differing geographical and cultural patterns affecting perceptions of colour. For instance, in Western countries, white is associated with purity, health, weddings, and has clean and innocent connotations; elsewhere white is worn for funerals and has very different meanings.

Despite the cultural difference across the globe, he showed research indicating that the preferred colour across the world is blue. “However, just because one colour is your personal favourite, doesn’t mean that you would only select packaging with that colour,” he explained.  “Red is almost universally the colour of danger and blood. However, many products, especially those that contain berry fruits, successfully sell just because they are red. In some countries, and at particular times of the year, red is associated with holidays, happiness and weddings. Context is all important. translations . There is nothing simple about colour perception,” he said.

Prof Westland said, in the future, he could envisage big data gathering and analysing colour perceptions and preferences, so that companies could appeal in a very tailored way to particular customer groups or even individual consumers.

Even now, as Stephen Westland has said, colour perception and branding is not simple; as we are bombarded with even more sources of online visuals in addition to images in the physical world, colour science is, perhaps, about to become even more complex.

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