Tag Archives: Education

Three reasons to attend the BAMA Forum and Awards 2017 event

Why should you attend this annual event?
As we move into August, with Autumn just around the corner, we are very pleased to be turning our attention to the upcoming BAMA Forum and Awards in October. Already, we’ve put together a packed agenda which includes expert speakers, networking opportunities and an exciting program of entertainment.

With so many reasons to attend this year, it’s difficult to consider why you wouldn’t want to come along. But in case you were in any doubt, we have put together three reasons why attending this year is a good decision:

1. Network with the experts. It’s not often that experts from so many different sectors are under one roof at the same time. Invited to our event this year are guests from a range of different aerosol businesses, as well as speakers from the fields of consumer behaviour, recycling systems, the circular economy, packaging and technology.
As an association, we recognise the importance for businesses to keep up to speed in a world driven by continual political, technological and environmental developments. As well as opportunities for members to network during the conference period of this event, our drinks reception and dinner platforms are also aimed to provide ALL guests with a relaxed and professional arena where ideas and views can be exchanged and connections made.

2. Wine tasting! If you’ve ever wondered about the art of wine tasting or would like to add to your existing knowledge of this famed fermented grape juice then who better to enlighten you than former BBC 2 Food and Drink series presenter and wine connoisseur, Jilly Goolden?
During the drinks reception, Jilly will be sharing her enthusiasm and knowledge on the crispness, body and aroma of selected wines from around the world. Following the wine tasting there will be a four course meal followed by some surprise entertainment!

3. Industry knowledge and recognition If you are a BAMA member, you are invited to listen to presentations from a range of different speakers who will be sharing their thoughts on the aerosol industry from their own unique viewpoints. The diverse speaker line-up will provide our audience with a wide and informed view of where the aerosol industry is right now and where it will be in the future.
With just a month left until the entry deadline, members are invited to submit their entries to be in the running to win. Winning entries will receive industry recognition, press coverage and vouchers worth up to £500 for winners and £250 for runners-up in each of four categories.

BAMA Forum and Awards Dinner details
The BAMA Forum and Awards Dinner will be held at Oulton Hall, Leeds on the 18th & 19th October with both members and non-members invited to the evening dinner on the 18th. Members can attend the conference and submit award entries also. For further information please contact Amy Falvey or visit the BAMA website to book your place.

Back

What do bikes and aerosols have in common?

The Brompton Bicycle company’s spokesman was interviewed on Radio 4’s Today Programme recently bemoaning the lack of talent emerging from the UK’s schools and colleges. There is an engineering skills shortage.

Bama1-071b_AdjustedAnd so it is in the aerosol industry. We reported in our May blog on what one member company is doing to tackle the shortage. Introducing an actively managed and highly effective apprentice scheme is something that many companies across the aerosol manufacturing stream are doing.

It’s that time of year when young people en masse are considering their future careers. As A level results are announced and GCSEs are anticipated eagerly, now is a timely moment for manufacturers in the aerosol and other chemical or technical industries to open their doors – and youngsters’ eyes – to the possibilities offered by a career in industry.

For those young people with a long summer holiday ahead of them who may for a variety of reasons not to go to university or further education, an apprentice scheme could be just the answer.

At the SCS (Society of Cosmetic Scientists) Scrub Up on Science competition finals at the Science Museum the other day, a member of the BAMA team met some 13 year old finalists who were passionate scientists, dedicated to pursuing their goals later in life and thrilled to have made some personal care products by using their impressive scientific knowledge.

Not all young people are as focused. Schools no doubt do their best but, as one school teacher said, ‘Science has a poor reputation in many schools. It’s just not seen as ‘cool’”.

So industry needs to do what perhaps schools cannot achieve and reach out to young people to show them that there is a variety of careers – at all levels in a manufacturing company – which they might consider. So whether it’s testing equipment or valves; can-making or filling; design or marketing… July and August could be a good time to promote the career opportunities within our wonderful sector.

As the latest filling figures showed, up again for the 4th successive year, the aerosol sector is vibrant and thriving and needs new applicants to keep it so.

If your company is looking to set up an apprenticeship scheme, please contact Amy Falvey for information on how BAMA can assist you.

Back

BAMA member Crown Aerosols engineers success through its UK Apprentice Scheme

With an increasing number of employers welcoming apprentices as well as Government support for apprentice schemes, there are more opportunities to get inside some of the most exciting and innovative companies in the country.

One of our member companies, CROWN Aerosols UK, has run a successful Apprenticeship Scheme for the past six years. The objective is to attract highly motivated and capable candidates, encourage ‘home-grown’ expertise and retain talented engineering staff.

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

The programme is open to new employees as well as existing Crown staff who are trained in-house to expand basic engineering skills as well as enhance the application of those skills in the workplace. To ensure a well-rounded programme, Crown combines the skills and experience of its own staff along with support from local partner colleges.
Crown Apprentices: Danny Lewis (Aged 24) and Tony Birch (aged 48) both took part in the scheme improving their job prospects and benefiting the company.
Danny’s apprenticeship has run for three and a half years and has included day-release to local colleges to complete external Level 1 and 2 and 3 EAL Diploma in Mechanical Engineering exams. During the apprenticeship, Danny has worked with every department to learn the different skills needed at the Sutton plant. He has recently taken on the role of Can Line Engineer where he is responsible for the smooth running and maintenance of the aerosol line.

Tony Birch applied to be a Crown Apprentice after working with the company for sixteen years. It was a major decision for Tony to apply for the apprenticeship in 2010, as he had a young family and it meant that he leaving his full-time, paid production line job and taking a drop in salary in order to complete the four year course with weekly study leave at College.

Tony was such a good student that he completed the four year course in two and a half years and won the ‘Metals Apprentice of the Year Award’ in 2013 from The Worshipful Company of Tinplate Workers alias Wire Workers. His job now entails making sure the production line runs smoothly: from the welding to checking the quality of the cans, right through to the seams; side striping; cured lacquer and high pressure testing. Completing the apprenticeship has paid off financially as it enabled Tony to earn a higher salary than in his former production line role.

In 2010 Crown won the Social Responsibility category for its Apprentice scheme in the BAMA Awards. These Awards highlight success stories in the aerosols industry, and were created to recognise innovation and continuous improvement in the aerosol sector. For more information on the 2015 Awards visit http://www.bama.co.uk/forum.

BAMA is currently working with Cogent Skills, a training provider, offering BAMA members the expertise in setting up a training/apprenticeship scheme to address your skills shortage. Government funding is available and Cogent can help you access it!

If you are a BAMA member and would like more information, contact Amy Falvey.

Back

We should celebrate the UK’s ‘can do’ approach

We were reading a community news feed1 that hit our desks the other day and it stopped us in our tracks.

Even though aerosol cans are easily recyclable – and 90% of people in Australia could recycle them, it seems around two thirds (66%) of Australians aren't sure what to do with them. The figure came up in a recycling report by Planet Ark and was reported by our counterpart organisation, the Aerosol Association of Australia (AAA).

Here in Britain, we often think of Australians as being steps ahead of us when it comes to recycling and sustainability.

Yet despite the good work of the AAA, aerosol cans seem to cause confusion with just one third (33%) of people in Oz correctly identifying them as recyclable; 54% incorrectly say they aren't recyclable; and a further 12% say they aren't sure. With Australians using a staggering 250 million aerosols every year, this means an enormous amount of recyclable high quality steel and aluminium is ending up in landfill.

It just acted as a reminder of how far we in the UK have come. Thanks to campaigns by BAMA such as our ‘Can Do’ Awards for local authorities, along with programmes such as the Alupro campaign, supported by BAMA and others, the majority of councils collect empty aerosols from the kerbside and most consumers know they can recycle them.

It’s salutary to remember that in 2001 just 7% of councils recycled empty aerosols; by 2009, 75% recycled; and by 2014 – over 90% recycled. This means that the 30000 tonnes of reclaimable high-grade metal waste produced via the 600 million aerosols or so used in the UK each year gets reused, not sent to landfill.

The latest research we conducted showed that the overwhelming majority of Brits know they can and should recycle aerosols and that, most importantly, most do. Of those who buy aerosols in the UK, 73% are recycling them.

We in the UK should be proud of this achievement. We’re never complacent; we know you don’t have to be bad to get better. However, we think it’s important sometimes to look back on how far we’ve come – and in the case of recycling aerosols, it’s a very long way indeed.

1. Source: http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/news/item/8d240b9d722d38c.aspx

2. Survey by GfK NOP for BAMA interviewed 1000 adults aged 16+ by telephone launched March 2013.

Back

The Appliance of Science

Nick Swift is from The Association of Science Education which runs the website SchoolScience.co.uk. He has been working with BAMA for many years to promote aerosol Science and Technology to schools. Nick is this month’s guest blogger.

Nick SwiftIf you work in the education business you are constantly bombarded by messages from industry, universities and government about the shortage of scientists, engineers and mathematicians. Dozens of websites and schemes are set up to try to solve the problem. None of them do any harm and many are excellent, but all too often they are schemes that will run for a while and then fade away.

The fact is that teachers need to be informed about how science is applied in the real world. I run the website www.schoolscience.co.uk and Twitter account @schoolscience that does just this. We channel scientific news to schools and create original learning resources. Much of science can be dry theory. Our aim is to show how the theory is applied.

When I was asked by BAMA to create teaching resources about aerosols, I jumped at the chance to show how that ubiquitous little can explains a lot of basic science. The index page is here http://www.schoolscience.co.uk/aerosolsindex
To gather the information required took many discusssions with the experts at BAMA and several visits to aerosol companies where I managed to grasp most of the technology. I learned that aerosols look simple and they are simple. The hard part is making billions of them cheaply. Getting into those companies was arranged by BAMA and was crucial to the project. No matter how much internet research you do, there is no substitute for seeing the processes and talking to employees. Some of those employees are featured in the resource.

The resource has to match the science curriculum, so the main issues are vapour pressure, ideal gas pressure, the pressure law, Boyle’s Law and resistance welding. There is a simple treatment of droplet size. Wherever possible, clear pictures and videos have been used. There are question pages and help with pressure units.

The web pages are created in a way that makes the resource editable, so if you have better pictures, more process detail, or any ideas for improving the resource, please get in touch with BAMA and we can look at editing the resource to include them. Comments on the resource are welcome too.

And finally… a story.
Once upon a time I was in Leeds city centre when a new construction project was creating pile foundations. The biggest pile drill I have ever seen was just starting up. Two teenage girls walked past the site entrance. One was awestruck at this massive machine and tried to get her friend to look. Her friend was impatient to get on and never gave the machine a glance. I watched them walk on and wondered if the awestruck girl would study civil engineering, get a £45k starting salary and travel the world.

We can never interest everyone in science and engineering, but giving them access to information at least gives everyone a chance.

Back

Apprenticeships…. back in vogue!

Cogent SkillsCogent Skills is the UK’s strategic body for skills in the science industries, led by sector employers. Lesley Coombes, Business Development Manager at Cogent is our guest blogger for July and informs you about the various Apprenticeships available.

We work with employers to develop, design and deploy skills solutions for the science industries. We support organisations engaging in Traineeships, Apprenticeships, industrial placements and graduate training programmes through the development of bespoke company training plans; providing a learning and development solution tailored to the needs of your business.

There are two types of Apprenticeships available – SMART Apprenticeships, which can be Level 2 or Level 3, and Higher Apprenticeships at Level 4 and above.

We are working closely in collaboration with BAMA, and hoping to create a SMART Apprenticeship for the process and manufacturing industries inclusive of additional training relating to the aerosol production by utilising BAMA’s courses. We are also looking to put BAMA through our quality assurance process and to benchmark their work against industry Gold Standards.

SMART Apprenticeships
SMART Apprenticeships put employers in control of the training to ensure that it is in line with the developments of industry, the company and job landing role of the apprentice. Hiring an apprentice can provide your organisation with many benefits:

• Employers have control of designing the standards so that the Apprenticeship responds to the needs of industry and the company.
• New and existing employees are able to learn and develop skills whilst making a positive contribution to the development and output of the company.
• Funding available through the Science Industry Partnership.
• Increased focus on training for the job means that the apprentice must demonstrate their ability through rigorous assessment at the end of their Apprenticeship.

Higher Apprenticeships (HA)
HAs provide employers with an alternative to graduate recruitment and the HA framework contains five pathways; Life Sciences, Chemical Science, Process Development, Packaging Development and Food Science. Hiring a Higher Apprentice can provide organisations with many benefits.

Some of these are:
• Building a diverse workforce with a range of different skills and perspectives;
• Skills are developed that are not only relevant to the science-based industries, but are specific to your business;
• There is the opportunity for science-based companies to receive up to 100% funding when recruiting a Higher Apprentice;
• Filling skills gaps with loyal, motivated members of staff.

If this is an area that you would like more information on and to find out how you can access funding, please contact Amy Falvey by email or on 0207 8285111.

Drinking lots of your immune system in a specific. Fully review your comments will help reduce reflux and let healthline editorial Team medically reviewed by george krucik viagra vs sildenafil md published on, any illnesses. Members medications for informational purposes and any medications it s symptoms within one or tightly enough weakened les that. Brian (krans) Medically reviewed on December – 22 2014 by.

Back