Tag Archives: Metal

A survey for BAMA finds that the aerosol format appeals to 9 out 10 consumers.

woman - recyclingWe were delighted to see that the vast majority of consumers – 92% – say they buy or use aerosols which we discovered via the results of a recent on-line omnibus survey undertaken for BAMA by research consultancy, Populus.

We found that 9 out of 10 people who buy or use aerosols have particular reasons for doing so and really understand some of the key and unique benefits.
92% agreed aerosols were easy to use;
86% said they are easy to direct just where you want the product to go;
80% thought they were airtight, clean and hygienic;
79% thought they were efficient;
78% agreed they make no mess or spills; and
75% liked the fact that they are sealed so cannot be contaminated.

People were pretty good at recycling too. Of those who buy or use aerosols, when asked what they do with empty containers, 68% recycle at the kerbside with household recycling; and 9% take their empty aerosols to a can bank.

When asked what kind of aerosols people recycle, deodorants / antiperspirants come out top, not surprisingly as this is one of the most popular categories in the market, with 85% of recyclers citing these products. Air fresheners are also sustainably handled after use by households that recycle, with 72% in this sector saying they include empty aerosol air fresheners in their household recycling.

We were interested to see the differences in recycling empty aerosols across the UK. Of those who buy or use aerosols, the top cities for recycling were: Hull (78%), Cardiff (73%), Manchester (71%); and Birmingham (69%).

If you have any questions relating to the recent survey, contact Communications & Office Manager – Amy Falvey.

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BAMA member Crown Aerosols engineers success through its UK Apprentice Scheme

With an increasing number of employers welcoming apprentices as well as Government support for apprentice schemes, there are more opportunities to get inside some of the most exciting and innovative companies in the country.

One of our member companies, CROWN Aerosols UK, has run a successful Apprenticeship Scheme for the past six years. The objective is to attract highly motivated and capable candidates, encourage ‘home-grown’ expertise and retain talented engineering staff.

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

Tony Birch (left) Danny Lewis (right)

The programme is open to new employees as well as existing Crown staff who are trained in-house to expand basic engineering skills as well as enhance the application of those skills in the workplace. To ensure a well-rounded programme, Crown combines the skills and experience of its own staff along with support from local partner colleges.
Crown Apprentices: Danny Lewis (Aged 24) and Tony Birch (aged 48) both took part in the scheme improving their job prospects and benefiting the company.
Danny’s apprenticeship has run for three and a half years and has included day-release to local colleges to complete external Level 1 and 2 and 3 EAL Diploma in Mechanical Engineering exams. During the apprenticeship, Danny has worked with every department to learn the different skills needed at the Sutton plant. He has recently taken on the role of Can Line Engineer where he is responsible for the smooth running and maintenance of the aerosol line.

Tony Birch applied to be a Crown Apprentice after working with the company for sixteen years. It was a major decision for Tony to apply for the apprenticeship in 2010, as he had a young family and it meant that he leaving his full-time, paid production line job and taking a drop in salary in order to complete the four year course with weekly study leave at College.

Tony was such a good student that he completed the four year course in two and a half years and won the ‘Metals Apprentice of the Year Award’ in 2013 from The Worshipful Company of Tinplate Workers alias Wire Workers. His job now entails making sure the production line runs smoothly: from the welding to checking the quality of the cans, right through to the seams; side striping; cured lacquer and high pressure testing. Completing the apprenticeship has paid off financially as it enabled Tony to earn a higher salary than in his former production line role.

In 2010 Crown won the Social Responsibility category for its Apprentice scheme in the BAMA Awards. These Awards highlight success stories in the aerosols industry, and were created to recognise innovation and continuous improvement in the aerosol sector. For more information on the 2015 Awards visit http://www.bama.co.uk/forum.

BAMA is currently working with Cogent Skills, a training provider, offering BAMA members the expertise in setting up a training/apprenticeship scheme to address your skills shortage. Government funding is available and Cogent can help you access it!

If you are a BAMA member and would like more information, contact Amy Falvey.

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We should celebrate the UK’s ‘can do’ approach

We were reading a community news feed1 that hit our desks the other day and it stopped us in our tracks.

Even though aerosol cans are easily recyclable – and 90% of people in Australia could recycle them, it seems around two thirds (66%) of Australians aren't sure what to do with them. The figure came up in a recycling report by Planet Ark and was reported by our counterpart organisation, the Aerosol Association of Australia (AAA).

Here in Britain, we often think of Australians as being steps ahead of us when it comes to recycling and sustainability.

Yet despite the good work of the AAA, aerosol cans seem to cause confusion with just one third (33%) of people in Oz correctly identifying them as recyclable; 54% incorrectly say they aren't recyclable; and a further 12% say they aren't sure. With Australians using a staggering 250 million aerosols every year, this means an enormous amount of recyclable high quality steel and aluminium is ending up in landfill.

It just acted as a reminder of how far we in the UK have come. Thanks to campaigns by BAMA such as our ‘Can Do’ Awards for local authorities, along with programmes such as the Alupro campaign, supported by BAMA and others, the majority of councils collect empty aerosols from the kerbside and most consumers know they can recycle them.

It’s salutary to remember that in 2001 just 7% of councils recycled empty aerosols; by 2009, 75% recycled; and by 2014 – over 90% recycled. This means that the 30000 tonnes of reclaimable high-grade metal waste produced via the 600 million aerosols or so used in the UK each year gets reused, not sent to landfill.

The latest research we conducted showed that the overwhelming majority of Brits know they can and should recycle aerosols and that, most importantly, most do. Of those who buy aerosols in the UK, 73% are recycling them.

We in the UK should be proud of this achievement. We’re never complacent; we know you don’t have to be bad to get better. However, we think it’s important sometimes to look back on how far we’ve come – and in the case of recycling aerosols, it’s a very long way indeed.

1. Source: http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/news/item/8d240b9d722d38c.aspx

2. Survey by GfK NOP for BAMA interviewed 1000 adults aged 16+ by telephone launched March 2013.

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