Tag Archives: Recycling

Jonathon Porritt, leading environmentalist and campaigner, praises the aerosol sector

Fourteen years ago, sustainability and aerosols would have been unlikely to have been seen by most people as a natural partnership. Today, Jonathon Porritt, the campaigning British environmentalist, perhaps best known for his championing of Green issues, his advocacy of the Green Party and Founder Director of Forum for the Future, has written the Foreword to our latest publication ‘Aerosols in Figures’.

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt writes: “…aerosols have a number of sustainability benefits: they are generally made of high quality, recyclable metal; they avoid any excessive use of preservatives, as they keep products clean and hygienic; they avoid waste and spills; and the latest developments in compression and reduced pack sizes are laudable.

“In addition, BAMA has played a very positive role in promoting recycling, both at the kerbside and at council recycling centres”.

He also recognises the valuable contribution our industry plays in the economy. “It’s worth reminding people that the aerosol industry in the UK is also a manufacturing ativan online https://canadianpharmacyonline.org/product/ativan/ success story, with significant exports which continue to make a strong contribution to the UK economy. None of which provides any excuse for complacency!”, he adds.

The green credentials of the sector have been continuously improving over time. Fourteen years ago, just over a quarter of Local Authorities were recycling household rubbish (27%) with fewer than 7% including aerosols in their recycling schemes.

We are proud that, today, over 96% of Local Authorities recycle aerosols; and many have got behind our campaigns to encourage more consumers to include empty aerosols in household recycling efforts.

The figures speak for themselves;

• Local Council Empty-Aerosol Recycling
In 2001 – just 7% included empty aerosols
By 2006 – 75% included empty aerosols.
By 2012 – 87% included empty aerosols.
By 2015 – over 96% include empty aerosols in their recycling schemes

If you would like to view the ‘Aerosols in Figures’ booklet in full it is free and available to download, or to request a printed copy, email BAMA's Administrator Liane Heskins.

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A survey for BAMA finds that the aerosol format appeals to 9 out 10 consumers.

woman - recyclingWe were delighted to see that the vast majority of consumers – 92% – say they buy or use aerosols which we discovered via the results of a recent on-line omnibus survey undertaken for BAMA by research consultancy, Populus.

We found that 9 out of 10 people who buy or use aerosols have particular reasons for doing so and really understand some of the key and unique benefits.
92% agreed aerosols were easy to use;
86% said they are easy to direct just where you want the product to go;
80% thought they were airtight, clean and hygienic;
79% thought they were efficient;
78% agreed they make no mess or spills; and
75% liked the fact that they are sealed so cannot be contaminated.

People were pretty good at recycling too. Of those who buy or use aerosols, when asked what they do with empty containers, 68% recycle at the kerbside with household recycling; and 9% take their empty aerosols to a can bank.

When asked what kind of aerosols people recycle, deodorants / antiperspirants come out top, not surprisingly as this is one of the most popular categories in the market, with 85% of recyclers citing these products. Air fresheners are also sustainably handled after use by households that recycle, with 72% in this sector saying they include empty aerosol air fresheners in their household recycling.

We were interested to see the differences in recycling empty aerosols across the UK. Of those who buy or use aerosols, the top cities for recycling were: Hull (78%), Cardiff (73%), Manchester (71%); and Birmingham (69%).

If you have any questions relating to the recent survey, contact Communications & Office Manager – Amy Falvey.

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We should celebrate the UK’s ‘can do’ approach

We were reading a community news feed1 that hit our desks the other day and it stopped us in our tracks.

Even though aerosol cans are easily recyclable – and 90% of people in Australia could recycle them, it seems around two thirds (66%) of Australians aren't sure what to do with them. The figure came up in a recycling report by Planet Ark and was reported by our counterpart organisation, the Aerosol Association of Australia (AAA).

Here in Britain, we often think of Australians as being steps ahead of us when it comes to recycling and sustainability.

Yet despite the good work of the AAA, aerosol cans seem to cause confusion with just one third (33%) of people in Oz correctly identifying them as recyclable; 54% incorrectly say they aren't recyclable; and a further 12% say they aren't sure. With Australians using a staggering 250 million aerosols every year, this means an enormous amount of recyclable high quality steel and aluminium is ending up in landfill.

It just acted as a reminder of how far we in the UK have come. Thanks to campaigns by BAMA such as our ‘Can Do’ Awards for local authorities, along with programmes such as the Alupro campaign, supported by BAMA and others, the majority of councils collect empty aerosols from the kerbside and most consumers know they can recycle them.

It’s salutary to remember that in 2001 just 7% of councils recycled empty aerosols; by 2009, 75% recycled; and by 2014 – over 90% recycled. This means that the 30000 tonnes of reclaimable high-grade metal waste produced via the 600 million aerosols or so used in the UK each year gets reused, not sent to landfill.

The latest research we conducted showed that the overwhelming majority of Brits know they can and should recycle aerosols and that, most importantly, most do. Of those who buy aerosols in the UK, 73% are recycling them.

We in the UK should be proud of this achievement. We’re never complacent; we know you don’t have to be bad to get better. However, we think it’s important sometimes to look back on how far we’ve come – and in the case of recycling aerosols, it’s a very long way indeed.

1. Source: http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/news/item/8d240b9d722d38c.aspx

2. Survey by GfK NOP for BAMA interviewed 1000 adults aged 16+ by telephone launched March 2013.

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Waitrose Gives Top Tips

clare photo2The importance of suppliers trying to see things through the retailers’ eyes was one of the key messages that members of BAMA at the 2014 Forum heard when Clare Norman, Waitrose Technical Manager for Household, Baby & Pets, presented her topic – ‘The future of aerosols – a retailer perspective’.

Ms Norman explained that Waitrose customers expect the stores to offer something different, so suppliers need to think of the bigger picture.  One way for suppliers to succeed is by offering something exclusive in the UK – perhaps selling the same concept in Europe but allowing Waitrose to offer that point of difference.

The presentation covered a number of retail topics including the importance of keeping the aerosol offer compelling, to keep up with customer expectations, through differentiation whilst minimising the impact of legislation and environmental perceptions.

She highlighted the ethos behind Waitrose, and went on to discuss challenges faced by the retailer and aerosol manufacturers, including the transportation of aerosols becoming more complex and the requirements of additional legal text on product.

Ms Norman said that new initiatives in aerosols will always be considered if the offer is compelling. “The challenges of increased and complex legislation regarding the transport of aerosols from the EU can be viewed as beneficial to UK manufacturers of aerosols selling in Britain.  This benefit should be maximised when talking to Waitrose as the Company is particularly interested in responsible sourcing, and sourcing from the UK,” she told BAMA members and their guests at the Forum.

The presentation also stressed that retailers were now keen to help act as the customers’ conscience. “The industry should all play their part in promoting to consumers that empty-aerosols are recyclable by looking to carry the message on packs and in-store,” Ms Norman advised.

Clare Norman represents Waitrose on The BAMA Retail Liaison Group which consists of technical representatives from many of the UK’s major retailers including several of the largest grocery, pharmacy and DIY groups. rackspace cloud . color palette .

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