Tag Archives: Sustainability

BAMA – helping you future proof your business

Patrick Heskins, CE of BAMA

Patrick Heskins, CE of BAMA

When I joined BAMA a year ago I was fortunate enough to inherit a substantial piece of work called the Future of Aerosols 2 project, a follow-up to the original Future of Aerosols 1 project which was completed in 2001. This first programme focused on technical subjects and solutions to see the aerosol industry into the 21st century.

For BAMA, sustainability and especially environmental sustainability has for decades been at the heart of what we do. During the Future of Aerosols 2 project, BAMA worked with Forum for the Future who reinvigorated our own thinking about environmental sustainability and also made recommendations about how companies should work towards a sustainable future within their own business environments. Examples are: persuading companies to consider how social media might impact on aerosol products; or the effect of the skills gaps within the aerosol industry.

BAMA, via its Committees, will be working on a number of Innovation themes to help our industry tackle some key issues including:
• The Circular Economy
• Air Quality – both indoor and outdoor
• Addressing Chemicals of Concern
• Using Aerosols to Meet Human Health Needs
• Harnessing the Power of Social Media
• Creating Flexible and Resilient Supply Chains.
Each of these themes is now developing into work areas for the Committees.

As part of the work-stream of the Future of Aerosols, Forum for the Future consulted widely across industry to understand the factors which our members felt would have an effect on their business in the coming years. These were then developed into Factor Cards which detailed the background of the issues, providing information and data to help people understand the impact of these factors in greater depth.

At workshops, BAMA members studied these factors and decided which were most important to the wider aerosol industry. These were then prioritised and put into an Impact/Uncertainty Matrix. From here the groups could narrow down the themes to those shown above and also run Innovation Sessions to think about how we might bring about solutions to these themes. This Future Thinking process is now available to all BAMA members – free of charge.

The toolkit used by BAMA Members in this study can be downloaded from the Community Area of the BAMA website, along with the report BAMA is working through.

We at BAMA believe this is an excellent opportunity for companies, big and small, to take a step back from their day-to-day business and think about the challenges they might face in the next 10 or 20 years. The Factors used cover such a broad spectrum of subjects the Future Thinking process could be applied in one area of your business, say R&D or manufacturing, or more widely, to review and consider how you want your company to develop and grow in the future.

To help with Future Thinking, BAMA will moderate and facilitate workshops at members companies, also free of charge. All we ask for is a big enough room and a couple of days from a group of your staff to take the process through.

If this is of interest, please contact us and we can discuss helping you to Future Proof your business.

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BAMA’s Chief Executive reviews the Aerosol & Dispensing Forum

Patrick Heskins, Chief ExecutiveThe team and I recently attended the Aerosol and Dispensing Forum in Paris and felt a short review may be of interest for those unable to make it this year.

It was a good opportunity to meet several of our member companies who were present there as well as seeing what other companies outside of the UK are up to. The lecture programme provided a good cross section of technical discussions with a less obvious commercial element compared to previous years. The seminars ranged from gasket technology for compressed gasses through bio-sourced materials and on to the latest in testing equipment.
For the can industry, this included seminars on powder coating for mono bloc aluminium cans from PPG, new optical systems for measuring the seams on aerosol cans from Mühlbauer Group, new possibilities for printing steel cans from Colep and the latest developments in leak detection, both during can production and whilst filling, from Wilco.

One of the most interesting developments on cans, for me at least, was hidden away in a far corner of the exhibition halls where Caprosol of Switzerland and Canada http://rxreviewz.com/canadadrugs-com/ was showing prototype samples of laser welded cans which do away with traditional seamed three piece tinplate cans. They claim up to a 30% reduction in material used which, if true, is a significant step forward for steel cans. The cans also look quite different to traditional three piece steel cans: more similar to a straight sided aluminium can. I will be very interested to see how this technology develops.

The last afternoon was dedicated to the latest ‘hot topic’ for the aerosol industry, plastic cans. The main issue for plastic aerosols is size restrictions within the Aerosol Dispenser Directive (ADD) and industry is working with FEA and an external consultant to try and amend the ADD to allow larger plastic aerosols on to the market whilst maintaining the high safety standards of the industry.

The wheels of the regulatory process do not always move at the speed industry would like but I am hopeful that the Plastic Aerosol Independent Review (PAIR) project will allow the aerosol industry to explore and develop this technology and further expand the range of products offered to our consumers.

As we at BAMA gear up to plan the launch of the 2016 BAMA Awards, we now look forward to see what exciting innovations and other developments the UK industry has in wait for us.

Patrick Heskins, Chief Executive, British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association (BAMA)

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Jonathon Porritt, leading environmentalist and campaigner, praises the aerosol sector

Fourteen years ago, sustainability and aerosols would have been unlikely to have been seen by most people as a natural partnership. Today, Jonathon Porritt, the campaigning British environmentalist, perhaps best known for his championing of Green issues, his advocacy of the Green Party and Founder Director of Forum for the Future, has written the Foreword to our latest publication ‘Aerosols in Figures’.

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt

Jonathon Porritt writes: “…aerosols have a number of sustainability benefits: they are generally made of high quality, recyclable metal; they avoid any excessive use of preservatives, as they keep products clean and hygienic; they avoid waste and spills; and the latest developments in compression and reduced pack sizes are laudable.

“In addition, BAMA has played a very positive role in promoting recycling, both at the kerbside and at council recycling centres”.

He also recognises the valuable contribution our industry plays in the economy. “It’s worth reminding people that the aerosol industry in the UK is also a manufacturing ativan online https://canadianpharmacyonline.org/product/ativan/ success story, with significant exports which continue to make a strong contribution to the UK economy. None of which provides any excuse for complacency!”, he adds.

The green credentials of the sector have been continuously improving over time. Fourteen years ago, just over a quarter of Local Authorities were recycling household rubbish (27%) with fewer than 7% including aerosols in their recycling schemes.

We are proud that, today, over 96% of Local Authorities recycle aerosols; and many have got behind our campaigns to encourage more consumers to include empty aerosols in household recycling efforts.

The figures speak for themselves;

• Local Council Empty-Aerosol Recycling
In 2001 – just 7% included empty aerosols
By 2006 – 75% included empty aerosols.
By 2012 – 87% included empty aerosols.
By 2015 – over 96% include empty aerosols in their recycling schemes

If you would like to view the ‘Aerosols in Figures’ booklet in full it is free and available to download, or to request a printed copy, email BAMA's Administrator Liane Heskins.

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Practical Toolkit introduced to help BAMA Members Plan for the Future

Forum for the FutureWe have just completed a major study undertaken in conjunction with Forum for the Future.

This was a follow up to a similar exercise undertaken in 2001. The Future of Aerosols 2, which has just been completed, has resulted in a practical ‘toolkit’ for sustainability to be used by our member companies in further developing their own future plans and predictions.

The process has involved http://cialisvsviagracomparison.com/ interviews and workshops with around 100 people from within the aerosol industry as well as from allied organisations and individuals.

Industry experts were asked to look back over the past decade or more and also to consider the coming 20-25 years, reviewing social trends, technological changes, economic trends and political factors. The process also asked participants to review both threats and opportunities in the coming years and to consider innovations and predictions.

Sessions have been held to introduce training skills to those who will be facilitating company workshops within their own business.

The 'toolkit' includes worksheets and topic prompts, covering factors that have been identified through the process. Member companies are invited to use these materials to help shape their businesses in to the future and BAMA will help to facilitate workshops, in house, at member offices.

Zoe Le Grand, Senior Sustainability Advisor of Forum for the Future, who led the training workshops said: “The aerosol industry has had to innovate its products in the face of environmental pressures in the past. The Future of Aerosols 2 project helped the BAMA membership to look broadly at a range of social, environmental and economic trends which could affect the industry in the long term and proactively identify responses to them.”

We welcome this kind of future thinking as we believe it offers a huge benefit to our members. It takes us beyond just the day-to-day challenges and helps establish what is truly important and not just what is urgent today, an important part of our role as a Trade Association.

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