Advice for those who have received a COVID-19 vaccine (10 March 2021)


Anyone who has been vaccinated has to follow government guidance on self-isolation, there have not been any exemptions made.


You may also be interested to read this public health matters blog on covid-19 vaccines, which includes a paragraph on why the rules haven’t changed for those who have been vaccinated.


Why is it important to keep following the rules once you have been Vaccinated?


It is not yet known whether vaccination will stop you from catching and passing on the virus and as no vaccine is completely effective, some people may still become infected with COVID-19 despite having been vaccinated (symptoms in this case should be less severe).


We don’t yet know if the vaccines stop you from passing the virus onto others, so while they will offer significant protection to the individual, you could still pass on COVID-19 to someone who has not been vaccinated. It is, therefore, important that even if you are vaccinated you must to follow the national guidelines to keep others safe and that if you are asked to or someone in your household has symptoms or tests positive, you must still self-isolate.


After you have received a COVID-19 vaccine your immune system may take a few weeks before developing a protective immune response. You should continue to follow the advice regarding practicing social distancing, wearing a face mask and washing your hands thoroughly and frequently.


You should also continue to follow the advice on testing and self-isolation if you develop any coronavirus symptoms or are undergoing regular testing, for example as part of a workplace or community testing programme.

Vaccination will not affect testing. The lateral flow device (LFD) test detects a different protein of the virus than the one encoded in the vaccine, and the PCR test detects different genes of the virus than the one included in the vaccine.


The vaccine cannot cause COVID-19 infection.


Click this link for further information on COVID-19 vaccines.

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